Sunday, April 22, 2012

A Very Private View

Some time, in or around 1900, after his release from prison, Oscar Wilde travelled to Taormina in Sicily. What drew him there was not so much the 'paradise on earth' of the place itself, but rather the homoerotic photographs of the German Wilhelm von Gloedon [1856 - 1931] who, in residence on the island, had established a reputation for transforming pictures of working-class Sicilian boys into beautifully composed images of antique legend.

Wilhelm von Gloedon, two young men, Taormina, Sicily

Wilhelm von Gloedon: 'Three Graces' 1890 Taormina, Sicily

What drew us to the Szépmúveszeti Múzeum so very recently was an invitation to a personal, private tour to be given by our friend, and museum guide, Angéla Kiss, of the current exhibition 'The Birth of Art Photography - From Pictoralism to Modern Photography 1889 - 1929'. Which did, as might be expected, feature the work of Wilhelm von Gloedon.


approach to the exhibition with poster 'Composition' 1925 by Rudolf Koppitz


entrance of the museum with poster 'Gloria Swanson' 1924 by Edward Steichen 


'Portal to Szépmúveszeti Múzeum' 2012 by Jane R. Hattatt


But so much more besides. From early pastoral scenes, with figures carefully arranged almost in replication of a Victorian water colour, to the comparative modernism of photographers whose later work bears all the hallmarks of the Cubist painters, some images are forever iconic. Not least among these is 'Steerage' by Alfred Steiglitz, dating from 1907.


the iconic photograph 'Steerage' 1907 by Alfred Steiglitz


Here the photographer captures a single moment on a trans-Atlantic liner. The image,  as if constructed in the way of a series of triangles and geometric shapes, conspires to elevate the poor and the dispossessed into something which transcends the everyday. Light shines on the boater of the onlooker, is reflected on the central gangplank, is caught on the crossed braces of the figure below deck and, yet again, is to be found illuminating the washing hung out to dry. This surely is art!


'Fork' 1928 by André Kertész [chosen with PGdeB and GC in mind]


Similarly, Hungarian born André Kertész, explores the area of Still Life with his 'Fork' of 1928. A simple household object becomes the focus of a picture where light and shadow interact in a way that the entire composition moves the observer from the now to the surreal. Or, as has been described, to a moment of 'formal poetry'.


portrait of Greta Garbo 1928 by Edward Steichen


Elsewhere the most striking portrait of Greta Garbo by Edward Steichen imposes all the presence of that formidable figure. By contrast, the experiment with movement by Jacques-Henri Lartique sees figures hastening through the Bois de Boulogne and speeding racing cars competing in some long forgotten Grand Prix.


Angéla Kiss, friend and guide, seen in the museum entrance


And how salutary all of this is. We look at our own photographs. We look again. Do we see a fusion of Kertész and Koppitz, of Steichen and Stieglitz? Is there a look of Lartique, a glimpse of Gloedon? Alas no. Most definitely not!



231 comments:

  1. Marvellous photos. Photography is probably my favourite visual art. Like yourselves, my photography will not be chosen for public display, but the photo of Ms Kiss is very good, yours or not.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. We were so impressed with the quality of some of the very early photographs as we were amazed at some of the cameras which were included in the exhibition.

      AG proved to be a most knowledgeable guide having really researched the material beforehand.

      Delete
  2. I love this post! Thank you so much for giving us a glimpse of your tour. I would have enjoyed being there so much! I met my husband in college, he was taking photo and I was taking art but my emphasis was photo. I was the only art student who had ever chosen photo as an emphasis at that university and they had to make up a program for me as I went along. Now they have a whole section for this and our son was there in the same program for two years before he changed schools. The photos you shared were beautiful and inspiring! Thank you!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. We are so pleased that you enjoyed this, Lisa, particularly as you obviously have a very special interest in photography which clearly runs throughout you family. How splendid, as a student, to have had a course tailor made for you.

      Delete
  3. Well I do like that picture by you Jane, I think it is stunning and the perspective makes me feel that I am right there with you looking up.
    How interesting, I've never thought much about photography in the past but I have been thinking recently about adding more art to my home, maybe some photos would be a nice modern addition.
    Thanks for introducing me to these photographers. The one photograph I do know is "Steerage", which so perfectly illustrates a time.
    I think "Fork" is formal poetry, that image will stay with me.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. We are delighted, Dani, that you noticed the picture of the portal!! Unfortunately our camera is the most basic and so we rely very heavily on chance.

      Photographs, old and new, do make for interest on the walls, particularly when they are framed imaginatively.

      'Steerage' really is an iconic photograph, and what a story it tells of, as you say, its time.

      Delete
  4. Seeing these wonderful old photos made me look up the history of the camera. I was more than surprised when I discovered, and I quote "The first camera obscura that was small enough for practical use as a portable drawing aid was built by Johann Zahn in 1685" The first "Kodak," was first offered for sale in 1888. The Brownie in 1910 looks just the same as my Brownie box in the 50's!!! Thanks for an interesting post and causing me to look up some information about the first cameras. Diane

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. You would have been most interested in the selection of cameras included in the exhibition,Diane. The early ones, for taking out into the field, so to speak, were huge, heavy and very cumbersome. We remember the Brownie 127 of the 1950s although nether of us ever 'graduated' to a box camera.

      Delete
  5. Dearest Jane and Lance - Dave used to say, "where you stand depends upon where you sit" and there's more than a modicum of truth there. Those lovely young men fuel no homoerotic emotions in me; I see glorious youth in all splendor and strength. However, I can also see how Oscar would have viewed differently. The Three Graces, while lovely, perhaps, show a lack of courage in the presentation. -smile-
    The Steiglitz photo, Steerage, tells so many stories within the edges boundaries; it makes me weep - the hope, promise, dreams - some to be dashed, others realized...such a dramatic photo!

    ReplyDelete
  6. What a wonderful experience this private viewing must have been. I am very envious. Your photos and the images you have selected to illustrate your very special tour are fabulous. J.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. We consider ourselves so very fortunate to have Angéla as a friend and it is through her work as a guide that we have been privileged to have a private tour of many of the exhibitions at the Fine Art Museum.

      Delete
  7. Ooh,those men were so surprisingly sexy for those times... My husband caught me looking. Oops! I think I'm in troubles :)

    I love Greta Garbo and this photo is excellent, showing off all of her statuesque beauty. Thanks for sharing it with us.
    Hugs and kisses

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Indeed, Petro, but in nearly all of his images of naked boys and men von Gloedon was at pains to relate them to the classical. At least all those which were published publicly!!

      The portrait of Greta Garbo is, indeed, most striking.

      Delete
  8. Dear Jane and Lance,
    I can't possibly describe how happy this post has made me! The first few images of the Sicilian boys and Wilde travelling there for the boys put a big smile on my face.

    Going back through history via these amazing and beautiful photographs was such a treat. I can imagine that you have enjoyed your private view very much.
    I often visit photography exhibitions, but one sticks in mind. It was the wonderful Henri Cartier Bresson, showing his work in three different galleries in London (simultaneously), for the first time in decades. This was in 1998 and I still remember the humanity, the humour and not to forget artistry of the pictures.

    Thank you for this wonderful, wonderful post.
    Have a lovely and art inspired Sunday.
    Red

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. And we cannot say how delighted we are that you found the post of interest, and how really generous of you to comment in such an enthusiastic manner. It is greatly appreciated.

      We do not know the work of Henri Cartier Bresson in anything but a passing manner and, sadly, know nothing of the 1998 exhibition. But we are inspired to investigate further so thank you so much for making mention of him.

      There is later this year to be an exhibition of the work of the American photographer Robert Mapplethorpe here in Budapest to which we are looking forward having, only last year, seen a show of his work in Eastbourne.

      Delete
    2. It was my absolute pleasure to reply in such manner Jane and Lance. You've certainly inspired me. I am doing my gardening at the moment and still thinking of the pictures you have posted.
      And i absolutely urge you to look up Bresson. His humour comes through his pictures and the way he caputres the unusual and the small details in evry day life is just wonderful and heart warming.
      As for Mapplethorpe - i of course know him but not that well. So, i'll have some homework to do on that front. And with pleasure.

      Delete
    3. We do assure you that we intend to follow up on Bresson. Like you we find photography as an art form to be most interesting. Mapplethorpe was an exceedingly strange person but his work is, very often, outstanding, or so we think. Many of his portrait subjects are of those who made a name for themselves in the 1960s.

      Enjoy your gardening!

      Delete
  9. I love 'Steerage' by Alfred Steiglitz. Not just because of its photographic qualities but because it is a bit radical. Even after living in squalid conditions for the long trip over from Liverpool to New York, passengers in steerage STILL had to go last. They weren't allowed to move until every 1st and 2nd class passenger was disembarked.

    Well done, The Birth of Art Photography!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Yes, for us too the appeal of 'Steerage' is the social commentary which it makes upon the times in which it was taken. Third Class travel, over a long distance, must have been absolutely appalling and, we think, completely inhumane.

      Delete
  10. The museum looks beautiful. I find myself drawn to the fork and three graces.thanks for the visual tour

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Like so many museums in so many cities throughout Europe, the Fine Art Museum in Budapest is a period piece and very much of its time. Interestingly, the architecture of the interior represents many different styles in order to give the visiting public, who may well have not in the early years of the C20 had the opportunity to travel, an experience of the 'foreign'.

      Delete
  11. Wow! Sounds like a marvellous exhibtion. "Steerage" is one of my favourite photographs, though it sounds like this exhibition is brimming with good stuff.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. You are right in saying that the exhibition is 'brimming' with good things. What we found particularly interesting was the fact that so many different photographers from so many different countries were represented.

      Delete
  12. To think that the Three Graces was taken over 120 years ago!...I love that they are all standing contraposta....so classical, yet so cutting edge for 1890. To be an artist then must have been exciting....rules were being broken all of the time .....and people changed how they thought because of art. Fabulous examples here.....It must have been a very inspirational day for you. Your photo of the portal contributes much to the story line.....

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Yes, we do so agree with you, Susan, that so much of the work could be related to either the classical or to paintings of the period by those artist who were prominent then, making the divide between painting and photography a very narrow one.

      Indeed, you are right, for we found the whole exhibition thoroughly inspirational.

      Delete
  13. Oh... I don't know?... You seem to have captured the light... even if it was in the entrance hall!
    You do get up to some marvelous adventures the pair of you!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. We do have great fun, Princess, as we rather suspect you do as well. And this exhibition was a highlight of recent days.

      Delete
  14. It figures that Wilde would be drawn by such photos... they are glorious skinscape, aren't they? Thanks for the tour of what looks like a great museum. What pictures!!!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Certainly Wilde was intrigued enough, no surprises there, to visit von Gloedon in his studio and see for himself. 'Skinscape' - now that really is a splendid term!!

      Delete
  15. Replies
    1. Ah yes, and not just appropriate to 'Steerage'!!

      Delete
  16. Thank you for a taste of this illuminating exhibition. I would have been drawn to it too, given my love of 'old' photographs. There are indeed some iconic images there, and it must have been wonderful to have your own personal tour guide.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Angéla did, in fact, make the tour very special and very personal. She has an extensive knowledge of the subject and so we came away having learnt a great deal.

      Delete
  17. I don't see why photography is decried as being inferior to 'art'....and your glimpses of this exhibition reinforce my views.
    Is there an online catalogue, by any chance?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. We do so agree with you and certainly consider serious photography to be an art form in the same way as so much else.

      Alas, this is Hungary and exhibitions of this kind rarely come with anything approaching a catalogue, either on or off line, that we might expect.

      Delete
  18. Fantastic exhibit, and in such a gorgeous space, as well. The fork and plate is a such a potent reminder of what the photographer's eye can see that most of us would miss. One photograph that is a constant marvel to me is Henri Cartier-Bresson's Behind the Gare St. Lazare. Every time I see it, I think, how did he spot that moment, and more to the point, be quick enough to capture it? Truly inspiring post!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. 'Fork' is, of course, rather like 'Steerage', an iconic image which does transport one to a different level of art appreciation.

      To our shame, we do not think that we know of the Bresson image of 'Behind the Gare St. Lazare' which you mention. We shall rectify that immediately and thank you for making mention of it.

      Delete
  19. Hello Jane and Jance, Thank you for showing such a wonderful collection of photographs. I love the work of the Victorian photographer Margaret Cameron, she was such an inovative artist. Jane xx

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. For some reason Margaret Cameron was not represented, but, like you, we very much admire her work. What struck us were the huge advances which were made in photography during the period covered by the exhibition.

      Delete
  20. I'm a little disappointed that there were no young men posing like that when I was in Taormina last year!
    It looks like a fabulous exhibition.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Perhaps, Tracey, you were just 100 or so more years too late!!

      Delete
  21. My brother was a photographer and I remembered as a child watching the completely magical process of images appearing in their chemical bath. If I were to take up anything remotely artistic then photography would be it.

    Wonderful opportunity to have a tour of the museum, in private no less.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Oh yes, the chemical processes which used to be involved with photography. Angéla was at pains to explain many of these complicated procedures to us - at times mind blowing!!

      Delete
  22. Such amazing and beautiful work...I love photography expositions especially featuring vintage works ~ I can get totally absorbed in viewing them.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Yes, we too, Adrienne, found ourselves becoming totally absorbed in so many of the works in the exhibition. But we recognise in you the photographer, for you always take such great care with the images which you include on all of your posts.

      Delete
  23. The Stieglitz photo, with its marvelous use of light, makes a deep impression.

    I noticed in your photo that the museum was also offering a mummy exhibit. I would love a chance to see their Egyptian antiquities--did you have time to look at them?

    Finally, I was quite impressed with that beautiful neoclassical building, and am assuming that it was just as attractive inside. Was it built as a museum, or as something else?
    --Road to Parnassus

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. The Stiehlitz image is extraordinary and made a deep impression on us.

      Yes, well spotted, there is also at the moment a temporary exhibition of 'Mummies' coming from, we believe, Egypt. Unfortunately, as of yet, we have not seen this particular exhibition but will hope to do so before it closes.

      The museum was purpose built in the very early years of the C20 and is very splendid both inside and out, even more so since a recent cleaning of the exterior of the building.

      Delete
  24. Dear Jane and Lance,

    How delighted I was to see that the Szepmuveazei chose to homage to the great Photographic Artist of the age. And how appropriate the exhibition title is, for early photography was a laborious process, as you well know. Models were tediously posed and positioned, then having to hold the pose while the photographer adjusted the lens bellows of the camera and then focused. I shutter to think of the sunburns that dawn of art photography saw being the sun was the only safe form of lighting for the art. Your post on this matter was, as always, beautifully written with reverence these pioneers deserve. Bravo.

    And how so very kind of Ms. Kiss to invite you for a personal and private viewing. Truly you two have a most wonderful circle of friends. And a certain Jane Hattatt’s work, “Portal to Szepmuveszeti Muzeum” – 2012 is a most iconic piece itself and fits comfortably well with the assemblage, kudos. – gary

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. How you flatter, yet again, dearest Gary, and how we fall for it every time [and love it too!!]. We are much amused at what you say here about the probability of sunburn in those early years of photography, and are now considering those bottoms in a completely new light having been exposed to the elements, doubtless to the delight of von Gloedon, for hours on end!!

      As a photographer yourself, Gary, and one we know to be of some standing, we are certain that you would much enjoy this exhibition which, very surprisingly, since it ends in time in 1929, was in places very modern indeed.

      Delete
  25. Dear Jane and Lance
    Very interesting exhibition ! You saw the course of photography for 100 years !I read that this exhibition is until first of Julie .Thank you for sharing this !
    Have a nice day
    Olympia

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. It was, indeed, Olympia an exceedingly interesting exhibition and one we should recommend to anyone. Yes, you are right, it does continue well into the summer so we may well go and have another look before it closes.

      Delete
  26. You outdid yourselves today with this thought provoking post.. I stopped dead onmy tracks with Sterrage and thought of my own grandparents coming to America by boat from Yugoslavia .. How little I know of them and that journey they took... I love photography.. Thank you for this so much.. Your commentary helped me to look at things with fresh eyes
    Cynthia

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Oh, Cynthia, to have been able to make such a connection between the image 'Steerage' and your own grandparents travelling to America from Europe is, we think, so wonderful and brings history so very alive and into the present. Perhaps one day you will write a post on just this subject which would be so fascinating.

      Delete
  27. I am not altogether certain that I can't see great photographic ability in a certain Jane R. Hattat's 2012 composition in the midst of this excellent selection. Is it on show also?

    Stieglitz's 'Steerage' is a photograph I can look at time and time again. Whether the shot is fortuitous or carefully weighed up and composed, it is a masterpiece.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Oh, Ursula, how kind of you to make such a generous comment. But no, no, no, we know our limitations!

      Stieglitz's 'Steerage' is an incredible work with so much new to be seen, and thought about, all of the time. Of course, it would be most interesting to know exactly how spontaneous this moment caught by the camera actually was.

      Delete
  28. There’s a pearly light captured in black and white which is lost somehow in the colours of modern pictures. The “Fork” is just stunning, the Swanson her usual piercing self, long before her close-up, and I’ve always wondered if perhaps Garbo needed her alone-time to practice “haunted” in the mirror.

    And the crowd in the ship---plays of light and expressions and positions---all the shapes and shadows---a quasi-Pieta in the two women at left, the tiny disappointed face in the bonnet at bottom right, and all the splashes of lightness which you mentioned. The grim grip on hope had to have SOME relief.

    Your Angela is the second “Kiss” I’ve encountered these past few days---does she also pronounce it “Keess?”

    I’m so pleased that you share such wonderful adventures!

    rachel

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. We do, for ourselves, much prefer black and white photography to colour, and those images which we have framed in our apartment are all of the former. We very much agree with the point which you make here about the quality of light. The portrait of Garbo is most striking and, most likely, well rehearsed.

      The play of light in 'Steerage' is, as you point out, extraordinary and we have been interested to look again in view of your most pertinent observations.

      Yes, Angéla's surname, which in Hungary always comes first as in Kiss Angéla, is pronounced exactly as you have said. 'S' in Hungarian is always pronounced as a soft sound, as in 'ship'. For it to be hard, then it is written as 'sz'.

      Delete
  29. What an amazing building beautiful place for a musuem. I have never heard of any these artists so thank you for sharing them. dee

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. The building is, as you say, amazing, Dee, and we really think that you would have enjoyed the exhibition. Many of the photographers were completely unknown to us too beforehand.

      Delete
  30. The picture of the fork being such a simple and everyday item is quite outstanding. I keep meaning to try out black and white photographs. Thank you for the inspiration, I shall enjoy experimenting.
    Sarah

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. We really find black and white photography often, but not always, more appealing than colour. 'Fork' is, as you say, Sarah, outstanding, in large part for the simplicity of the original idea.

      Delete
  31. Dear Jane and Lance,

    Well, you certainly got my attention with the first picture. All the photographs are wonderful, but more than anything, I loved your description of Steerage. I saw so much more through your eyes.
    Arleen

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you so much, Arleen. We find that the more we look at 'Steerage' the more there is to see. This was also so of many of the other images present in the exhibition, some of which, even as early as the 1920s, could be considered as modern, if not contemporary, art.

      Delete
  32. Hello Lance and Jane, wow, that steerage photo took my breath away. I often think of my grandparents journey from Italy in the very early 1900's. I know my grandmother suffered seasickness. This is a fantastic exhibit. Thanks for sharing. xo

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Your comment here, Barbara, as Cynthia's above, touches on the very personal and brings the past very much into the present. We remain fascinated with the idea of so many people, for so many different reasons, leaving their homelands in the past to start new lives in countries which must, at the time, have seemed so very foreign.

      Delete
  33. Oh, I'm sure I got a "glimpse of Gloedon" coming out of the loo in one of your recent photos.

    But, truly, what a wonderful post. The "approach to the exposition" with the larger than life nude displayed would, sadly, never have gotten past the censors in the USA.

    I would love to see the exhibition. How fortunate you were to have a private tour. Thanks for sharing a bit here.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Now, Mitch, enough of that!!

      The work of von Gloedon was well represented in the exhibition but, as you might easily imagine, those images most likely of interest to Oscar Wilde were not shown.

      Angéla was, as always, a superb guide.

      Delete
  34. How very fascinating, thank you for a lovely post once again!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. We are so pleased that you enjoyed this post, Nina. It was fun putting it together.

      Delete
  35. Such marvellous photographs, anyone who can make a fork on a plate look so beautiful is truly an artist.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. We absolutely agree with you, Tabitha. It is, of course, a remarkable image, as were many in the exhibition.

      Delete
  36. A beautiful selection from the show with the sort of descriptions worthy of only the most sought-after curatorial pen! And as for all those cheeks! Thank you for daring!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. This is so very generous of you, Paul. That apart, we have delighted in this comment, as you will know only too well. Lovely.

      Delete
  37. So much can be said for the great photographers of the past, especially for the groudbreaking photographs of von Gloedon. A nice post for me to come back to.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Certainly von Gloedon was pushing the boundaries at the time, and for that alone he is deserving of admiration. And for ourselves, we are delighted to see the return of the style and sophistication which is represented by 'Savoir Faire'.

      Delete
  38. Wowsers! Green , green with envy and wish I could see the show.
    von Gloeden new to me and rather Gide-ishly fascinating.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Oh yes, Elizabeth, there was something of the Gide about both Oscar Wilde and von Gloedon and it is so interesting, we find, to see how the lives of certain people in certain times overlapped and intertwined!

      We are sure, knowing your painterly eye, that you would find the exhibition of great interest. A visual feast!

      Delete
  39. ..always happy to see Andre Kertesz getting exposure...
    Giuseppe de Piero via Beatnheart

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. The work of André Kertesz, which was relatively unknown to us before we came to Budapest, is now becoming increasingly familiar as exhibitions of his work are frequently to be seen in the capital. But, outside Hungary, he is perhaps far less well known and certainly deserves recognition for his excellent, in our view, photography!

      Delete
  40. Dear Jane and Lance,
    thank you for giving us a tour through this very interesting exhibition!
    The Taormina boys are lovely - the island was visited by 'my' adored Gaylord Hauser often (I think he bought a villa there). He was also the beauty guru of Greta Garbo!
    I opt to see every photo exhibition I can get to - about Imre Kertész we had a very interesting one last year in Berlin.
    I like your photograph of the 'Portal to Szépaúveszeti Múseum' very much, Jane! Black and white photography plays so powerful with light and shadow - fascinating. Our world now is so colourful that it sometimes numbs the eyes.
    Though I love colours - it is just another medium to work with.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. We had never heard of'your' Hauser until now, but he was certainly an interesting individual. How Taormina seems to attract the avant-garde!!

      We are certain that you would find this exhibition of great interest and perhaps it could entice you to visit Budapest? Berlin does attract some wonderful exhibitions and we seem to remember that Kertész's work was shown there quite recently.

      Thank you so much for your kind compliment. Black and white photography remains a favourite with us too.

      Delete
  41. Very moving glimpses of the past. You have all the right friends in so many astonishing places :))), what's next>? I'd love to read you guys more often, you're quite a sight for sore eyes :).

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Dear Petronela, you are always so very kind and generous about our posts. We simply do not have any more time in which to devote to our blog, but we are thrilled that you enjoy what we write!

      Delete
  42. Wonderful pics, Hattats. I often think we've haven't come a long way in photography. One runs out of superlatives when seeking to describe some of the images of early photographers. I was never quite sold on von Gloedon's Sicilian stuff, but Steichen and Steiglitz are something else. Didn't know Kertesz so thanks for that. I'll pursue his work.
    Incidentally, do you know the writings of Norman Douglas? I don't know if he knew von Gloedon, but I think their time in Italy must have overlapped. I've only just started reading Douglas. He's a marvellous writer, who lived on Capri, and reflects in his life and writings the world that von Gloedon photographed. Even down to the boys.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Yes, we tend to agree with you, dear Alec, about the developments made in photography since, on looking carefully at the pictures of 1929, we were struck by how contemporary they appeared to be. Of course, the advances in the technology of photography have been immense which does serve to make one even more impressed by those early pioneers of the art.

      We know of Norman Douglas through the writings of others but have not read any of his work. We suspect that you could be correct about a possible overlap with von Gloedon since the timing would have been right. Perhaps we shall give his novels a try.

      We are delighted to have introduced you to Kertész and are reasonably certain that you would find his work of interest.

      Delete
  43. Even just one of these artists is easily worth a trip to the Szépmúveszeti Múzeum. I'm particularly fond of the American social photographers but those cute little bums photographed by Wilhelm von Gloedon aren't so bad either!
    I was looking at the museum's website and the photo of Gloria Swanson featured at the entrance and by Edward Steichen is simply beautiful!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. We are certainly aware of and admirers of the photojournalist work of Dorothea Lange, many of her images having become iconic. Her work was not included here but would probably have been too late.

      We loved 'The Three Graces' particularly although there were several works by von Gloedon included in the exhibition.

      Gloria Swanson was photographed through a lace curtain to obtain the image shown. We are pleased that you like, as do we.

      Delete
  44. Such an amazing exhibit. Thank you for the images. So inspiring.
    Thanks for stopping by my blog, and yes, we had a wonderful time at dinner... we closed the place down!!!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. In addition to the photographs, there is also a display of early cameras and they were fascinating too. The first 'portable' versions looked to have needed an extremely strong armed carrier!!!

      You certainly looked to be having a wonderful time. We are delighted!

      Delete
  45. I do like your selection of photographs. Art photography is such a broad topic that I am surprised they managed to deal with it in just one exhibition, but from the photos you have posted, it looks as if they did a good job. I had not heard of André Kertész,which is very ignorant of me. I love the fork picture - so simple, and so clever - and I will look out for his work now.

    I find it hard to know how to pinpoint what makes a photo good. But all of these are good, although perhaps it is not surprising that the ones we take ourselves can't compete with such artistry!

    I wonder if this exhibition will eventually come to London. I'd like to see it.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. There were, as you may imagine, many gaps in the exhibition since, as you say, it would have been a near impossibility to be representative of all the work carried out between those dates. What we found to be a particularly glaring omission was photography from the First World War, but that was probably due to the focus on 'Art' photography rather than photojournalism.

      We are delighted to have introduced you to Kertész and hope that you will find his work to be of interest. We think that much of his work looks very modern.

      The eye for a good composition is, we believe, the essential component for great photography. When we produce a half decent photograph, it owes more to good luck than good management!!

      Delete
  46. Jane and Lance, A wonderful selection of photographs. It is amazing what is made more visible when we strip away the color and allow shadows and texture tell the story. Thank you for introducing these artist. You do take us on the most interesting field trips. Bonnie

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. We do so agree that colour can be distracting and when images are pared down to the monochrome so many other elements come into play. We are so pleased that you have enjoyed looking at the work of these artists, we certainly enjoyed the exhibition very much indeed.

      Delete
  47. Dear Jane and Lance, What a joy to see these stunning photographs and I imagine you must have had a fabulous time having your own private and personal showing of some of the world's great masters of photography. Your tour is so well written and graciously shared. Andre Kertesz's photograph is surely poetic and I shall never look upon my 'Three Graces' (three crabapple trees that are side by side . . . never moved to a permanent location growing together gracefully . . . thus my having named them after the Three Graces.) in quite the same way. How exquisite the human form can be and Wilhelm von Gloedon certainly had the eye for capturing the beauty of it. Photography is so different today and we have no real way of saving the jpegs. I do love your photograph of the portal of this most impressive museum. What a charmed life you lead.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you so much, dearest Carol, for your kind and very generous comment. We are really spoiled by Angéla who has guided us through so many wonderful exhibitions and all away from the madding crowds. She is incredibly knowledgeable and her enthusiasm for Art in all its forms is infectious. We are so pleased to have her as a friend.

      Your comment about the'Three Graces'of Flower Hill Farm and von Gloedon's version really made us smile. We shall now think of your going into your orchard and the wide grin on your face which will surely accompany you there!!!

      Delete
  48. Dear Jane and Lance:

    Now that the world of photography has been transformed with digital cameras, and folks are taking random shots with their cell phones, these early prints are all the more to be admired, not just as time capsules, but for the expertise that went into taking and developing them. Even so, it still takes a good eye to accomplish a good composition, and your image of the portal shows that you've got it!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. The processes of taking photographs have indeed developed significantly since those early days. Just imagining the scene of those first pioneers with the most cumbersome of equipment and portable laboratories for the developing of photographic plates makes one full of admiration, as you say, for their efforts. And, the final results are truly inspiring.

      You are most kind and generous about our own amateur efforts. Serendipity and a lucky moment!

      Delete
  49. I have been lingering over the photograph of Greta Garbo, longing to know how she was feeling. I see tension, focus, confidence, determination and maybe a little sadness in her expression. Photographs can capture something that only exists for seconds. But then I'm very drawn to 'Fork' and ask myself, "how on earth can I find a photograph of a fork haunting?"
    I really appreciated this post. I learned so much, your tour guide and friend should be very proud of the wider audience she has inadvertently introduced to these works. You share some very special insights into Art and history with us, thank-you.

    Lucy x

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Oh, Lucy, we know exactly what you mean about the haunting power of photographs. Some images really do just take hold of one and will not be shaken off. For ourselves, we regard this as the way of determining which are the photographs which are so much more than a representation of reality, they convey emotion too.

      Angéla is a brilliant guide. She wears her knowledge lightly, allowing our imaginations to roam free and explore all manner of avenues. We do so hope that she will be delighted by the wider audience appreciation of this blog post. We are only sorry that a 'virtual' tour of the whole exhibition was not possible with Angéla showing us the way!

      Delete
  50. Hello! We are amatuer photographer...I agree with You.But I want to say something ...I never will understand human without clothers...May be I am not riht for art...Steerage is very beautiful...
    Have a wonderful days!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Dear Amin, we all have very different approaches to Art. And that surely is a very good thing.

      'Steerage' is indeed a wonderful photograph. So much is conveyed by that one image, we feel.

      Delete
  51. Your this post is very interesting and I have foggoten to say that I did my last photo in one of city gardens...behind is a buildings...

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you.
      We rather liked the hidden buildings to be just glimpsed in the background. It gave the image a mysterious quality.

      Hoping that you have an enjoyable week!

      Delete
  52. I would love to see that photo exhibition!

    For my own photos, I am pleased if I remember to take off the lens cap!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. We are sure that when you were in Berlin you saw some wonderful exhibitions there too. But,perhaps, the thought of such goodies to be found in Budapest may tempt you here one day?

      We really laughed about the lens cap. Our 'point and shoot' affair has no such sophistication!!!

      Delete
  53. Ah now, you judge your photos too harshly. A round of brandies here for my friends, the well-known Hattatts, please, waiter, and we'll look at these photos of theirs again. Immense suggestions of Kertész and Koppitz, bucketfuls of Steichen and Stieglitz. A definite hint of Lartique, an echo of Gloedon.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Dearest Mise, you are too kind and too generous, but we love you for it. Your Blogtopian view of the virtual world is so refreshing and we are seduced every time that we make a visit to your own deliciously delightful corner of the Blogosphere.

      We hope that your week will be filled with blue skies, homemade goodies and joy....bucketfuls of joy!!!!

      Delete
  54. Steerage and fork, my favourites here, such wonderful composition. I would love to visit this exhibition. A joy to share.
    Many thanks
    Di's
    X

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Yes, if we could choose to own any of the images from the exhibition it would, in all probability, be one of these. We are sure that you would love it all.

      Delete
  55. First of all... your friend is named Angela Kiss? Surely the prettiest name on earth! What a difference a personal tour makes to visiting a gallery. I personally hate the little electronic guides, much preferring a real person so that I can (rudely) interject with whatever question is burning in my mind. I don't feel too guilty, actually, because I always figure they like being asked questions for a little variety. Anyway, I digress...

    The commonest things on earth or the most precious - yes, all can be art, I believe too. All in the composition, the shade, the light, the balance, the perspective. A bit like garden design then, very personal to you, or architecture come to that.

    A truly exciting exhibition - and the kind which lives on in one's mind after leaving. The power of art!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Yes, we agree, Angéla has a lovely name and, as you may expect, a personality which exactly matches. We are so fortunate to have her giving us private tours of the exhibitions at the Fine Art Gallery -we think that she likes to practise her English - and we have seen some wonderful exhibitions under her guidance.

      You mention both architecture and garden design, Virginia. We certainly believe that at their best they readily qualify to be considered as art forms.

      The power of art indeed. We are still considering all that we have seen.

      Delete
  56. Oooh, dear I'm having naughty thoughts ;)
    Such impressive work, it's an exhibition I would love to see in person.
    Awesome pictures !
    ~Jo

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Now that you should not!!

      The exhibition is very well put together and we do hope will be well attended before it closes in July.

      Delete
  57. Hello Jane and Lance

    Jane your photo is beautifully composed and leads the viewer into the subject.

    Steetage is like a painting and you beautifully describe why it works so perfectly. The variety of shapes, the values and the continuity of colour and value all works so perfectly to keep the viewer in the piece. The fork and its reflection is also captivating.

    This is a beautiful exhibition and you so beautifully describe your visit.

    I also learned about Oscar Wilde. Many thanks for another enlightening post

    Wishing you a brilliant week

    Helenxx

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. You are, dear Helen, as always most generous in your comments.

      Indeed 'Steerage' could well be a painting and has, as you suggest here, so many of the elements which make for a successful piece of art, not least in this instance the way in which the observer is drawn into the scene and then, from that point onwards, is allowed to 'visit' the various component parts.

      Oscar Wilde is a figure of enormous interest and one who must, we feel, have had a brilliant mind.

      Delete
  58. How wonderful that you were able to have a private tour to see the photography exhibition. What beautiful images show the craft that it takes.
    I must admit I love the photo of the Museum. What a fabulous building !

    cheers, parsnip

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. It is so kind of Angéla to offer us these tours, something which makes an exhibition very personal indeed.

      The museum building is very handsome and dominates one side of Heroes' Square in Budapest, an area much visited by tourists.

      Delete
  59. Another thought provoking post, Jane and Lance. The photo, 'Steerage' so reminds me of the time my mother and brother and I came by ship into New York harbor, a life changing event for all of us. Though I was only about five, I do remember. While looking at the photo I was also thinking of the anniversary of the sinking of the Titanic and how steerage on that ship must have looked remarkably similar.

    Wonderful photography by all the photographers mentioned and how fortunate you were to be given a private showing.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. How very interesting, Yvette, that you are able to recall arriving in New York harbour by ship. We can only imagine what the thoughts and feelings of you all must have been, something which will, in all probability, always be with you.

      Yes, we are certain that the image 'Steerage' must closely reflect what the conditions must have been like for the Third Class passengers on the ill-fated Titanic 100 years ago.

      Delete
  60. Wow! Fingers crossed they bring this exhibition to Australia! "Steerage" reminds me of the work of Sebastio Selgado - one of my favourites and in turn some of Bill Henson's latest (and probably equally as controversial) imagery reminds me of W-von Gloedon's perspective. Very interesting... thank you so much for sharing! Have a great week!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Unfortunately we have no knowledge as to whether this particular exhibition will 'travel'. We rather think not and that it has been specifically curated for Budapest.

      Neither Selgado nor Henson are known to us. Thank you for mentioning these two whose work we shall most certainly look up.

      Delete
  61. An exhibition I wouldn't mind seeing - with or without guided tour, although I'm afraid I would not recognize the truly artistic element in every single picture without someone pointing it out to me.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Definitely an exhibition, Meike, which is well worth seeing. The joy of having an informed guide, such as Angéla, is that one does learn and also one 'sees' in new, different ways.

      Delete
  62. What a feast for the eyes this post is.... if I had to pick three images from it, it would be the top one, the Gloria Swanson poster and the stunning one of the fork and the plate. There is something so very stylish about monochromatic photographs.........

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. It would we think be very difficult to select just three images, particularly from the entire exhibition, but those we have shown do certainly rank among our favourites. Gloria Swanson, interestingly, is pictured through a piece of lace.

      Delete
  63. A private tour, and of such a super exhibition! Lucky you :-) B&W photography has a power & beauty all of its own.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. We consider ourselves really fortunate to be asked by Angéla to tour such exhibitions in this way. She has this wonderful capacity to bring it all alive.

      Delete
  64. What a wonderful start to my Monday! Monday, the usually sad day when I clean and clean the house. But this was just wonderful to see. Thank you so much for taking the time to share it with us!

    This is the time of photography that has always really spoken to me. Actually, the very first photography book that I bought was a monograph of Mr. Steichen's work. I think that I was 14. From there it was an easy introduction to the works of his fine colleagues. Such force in their simplicity. And such casual elegance in the work of the Pictorialists!

    I was so lucky to see both the Bresson and Lartigue retrospectives in Paris a few years back. It was so stunning to see their body of work and to read the thoughts behind each photo.

    Oh, and one last thing, I would be remiss if I didn't admit to having been profoundly influenced by the amazing photo of Greta Garbo in my acting days--I could stare at it for hours!!

    Sending much love to you both from a very sunny Arles,
    Heather

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Heather, this is so sweet of you and we are so pleased to have added a little cheer to your Monday of household chores!!

      How amazing that you should have been interested in photography from a very early age. There cannot, sadly, be over many teenagers who would spend pocket money on a book of Steichen's work. But what a splendid platform for everything else.

      Bresson's work, as we replied to another commentator above, we scarcely know [and for this we are suitably shamed and humbled]. Lartique we find positively electrifying and how wonderful for you to have seen the Paris exhibition.

      We are not at all surprised to learn of the influence that Garbo may have had on you - such a force of personality - but you have now intrigued us with mention of your acting days. More must be told!!

      And never forget, dear Heather, that Eurolines bus leaving from Avignon at some unearthly nightly hour twice a week!!

      Delete
  65. i really enjoyed reading this post and love the photos particularly the one of the fork, which i haven't seen before. I've been reading a novel which had lots about photography and have ordered 'on photography' from the library so i can read more! It looks like an amazing museum.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. We are so very pleased that you have enjoyed the post, Sian, and thank you so much for taking the time and trouble to say so. We are most intrigued to learn of the novel you have been reading and are now wondering about the title and author.

      Delete
  66. I had no idea about these photographers and do particularly like the photo of the fork, and the pose of Garbo, that must have been some exhibit to see, nice to have a guide at the museum too as tidbits about the works are so important.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. They really were a most talented group of people, Linda. It always adds to an exhibition such as this to have the benefit of additional material, such as Angéla was able to provide.

      Delete
  67. Oh dear. Whenever I'm faced with real photography my sad inadequacy in this field is woefully apparent. But don't these wonderfully thought provoking images just uplift the soul??!!

    But YOU have nothing to be ashamed of with that wonderful shot, Jane!! It's superb!!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. You really are being far too modest as anyone looking through 'Red Nomad OZ' will realise immediately. Some of your photographs are truly outstanding and form such an imaginative and artistic record of both the Australian countryside and the Australian way of life.

      And thank you for such a kind, but untrue(!!) compliment.

      Delete
  68. I do so love your posts, Jane and Lance - there is always so much to learn, enjoy and amuse in them - not least here...and as your readership has grown, I find I love reading all the comments and your excellent replies too. It's an art form in itself and like taking part in a worldwide, informed, often light-hearted and always interesting and knowledgeable conversation. A wonderful phenomenon that isn't found on many blogs - congratulations you two! You are really something. Axxx

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. That is so very kind of you, Annie, and exceedingly generous. We are always so very touched by people, such as yourself, taking the time and trouble to comment and really do value the dialogue which it is possible to establish with so many people from around the world who, in time, despite being part of the Blogosphere, are very real to us.

      Delete
  69. The Graces and Greta - perfection. Thank you from the bottom of my heart, which looks nothing like the bottoms in these artful eyefuls. Not that one wants an eye full of just any art - especially of 'the fork'. Ouch. LOVE the visit, as usual.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Aren't they wonderful, Helen? Such fun and, at least where the bottoms are concerned, so very risqué when first published over 100 years ago. No wonder that Oscar Wilde was hot foot out of prison to Taormina!

      Delete
  70. What a glorious set of photos, lucky Hats to have got a private tour.

    It's always lovely to visit your site xx

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Yes, we always feel very privileged to be given a personal tour with Angéla. One does see more, we think, with a guide as it makes one slow down and notice details that might otherwise be overlooked.

      Thank you for your kind comment. It is always a pleasure to welcome you here!

      Delete
  71. I envy your personal tour through the exhibit. It looks extraordinary. For one, I am very attracted to older photos [and film], as it's like being able to travel to a different time. Which I find enthralling. I love history as much as the future. Plus, I love art, so the photos attract me on that level, too. When I returned to NYC over a year ago for a family emergency, when I got a chance to go into the city, the thing I most wanted to do was go to an art museum. One of the only things I miss about living out in the wilderness. :)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. This exhibition is so curious in that although one is seeing photographs from the very first examples through to those from the late 1920s, many of them appear very modern, even contemporary in feel. Perhaps the themes that are explored through Art change little even over decades?

      We should certainly miss the museums, art galleries, opera,music concerts and cinema which Budapest offers in such variety and quality if we were to live in the countryside. However, the sodium glow in the night sky is not the perfect background for stargazing!!!!

      Delete
  72. I wish we lived near more art exhibits--we have to travel to see anything and frankly, a live viewing beats the online/book view any day!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. We do feel very fortunate to have so many cultural riches within easy reach since, as you say, the 'real thing' is so much more satisfying than an indirect review.

      Delete
  73. thank you so much for sharing this with me/us. how wonderful to receive a private tour. i adore old photography. the "steerage" photo is one i've never seen and what a work of art. thanks again, you two sure get around! xo janet

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. 'Steerage' certainly is an interesting image. We are so pleased that you like it too. A private tour does, as you may imagine, add an extra dimension to the exhibition.

      Delete
  74. Hello Jane and hello Lance and hello to all your admirers,
    I am going to keep this reply rather short. I know this will greatly sadden you for you wait with gleeful anticipation, my deeply thoughtful comments.
    And thus, a wondrous exhibition that you have shared with us via such amazing photos and cleverly conceived captions clearly causing contentment. And glad to see you marvellous pair have done a bit of alliteration.
    Now back to my blog. Cheerio and happy writing.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. There can only be real joy when we hear from you, Gary, and this is no exception. Of course, prior to your comment appearing we were somewhat fretting, but now all is well!!

      As for the alliteration we are so pleased that you noticed - we are trying!

      Delete
  75. Oh goodness, you lucky things, I'd considering selling a child for such an opportunity! Steiglitz was a master, I'm a huge fan. And so much else here that's iconic.

    My father collects old plate cameras and was a bit of an alternate - for which read old fashioned - process buff before age rendered his hands too shaky for the darkroom. Growing up I was always his darkroom assistant. Now we're both all digital, with the exception of my Polaroid passion, but I do miss working with film and chemicals.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Oh, Annie, how we have laughed at your first sentence! Alas, we do not have one to sell for any future occasion. We are, of course, delighted to hear that you are a fan of Steiglitz, as are we, and this exhibition was wonderful in every possible way.

      How splendid that your father has such an interest in photography and to have a collection of old plate cameras, of which there were some in the exhibition, is quite something. Hold on to them!!

      Delete
  76. Famous photographers leave their images just as the great painters leave their work forever. Then you find yourself wondering how you didn't notice that.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Certainly all of these photographers need to be considered as great artists in our view. But then you, of all people, would know that,Olga.

      Delete
  77. I know this may seem simplistic but out them all I really like "The Fork". The composition is simple but the it's the contrast that really sets it off for me.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. We do not think that at all simplistic, Robbie, and certainly we consider 'Fork' to be an absolute masterpiece. Besides, who is judging?!!

      Delete
  78. Hello Jane and Lance, the singularity of these early photographs, of what are otherwise ordinary things or portraits, suggests to me how time and apprehension were quickening. The medium of photography was still so new, its practitioners were circumspect, and the world was entering a new age. I sense that the photographers had a sense of awe about the world around them and wanted to signify it before it moved on.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. You make a most interesting and valid point here, Faisal, and certainly by 1929, the point at which the exhibition ends, things were changing very rapidly indeed with the advent of commercial cinema photography. Yes, we entirely agree about that sense of 'awe' which, on consideration, is common to so much of the early work.

      Delete
  79. This looks just delicious!!!! I wish this came to Toronto!!! Absolutely stunning! You lucky dogs! Im envious of the experience! :)

    Hugs,

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. You are so right, Katherine, for the exhibition was a wonderful experience and we, through Angéla, learnt so very much.

      Delete
  80. Hello my dear friends,
    As a small token of my respect and appreciation, there's a little humble surprise for you @ http://theseamanmom.blogspot.com/2012/04/versatile-blogger-award.html
    Hugs

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. As it happens we saw your post, upon which we have left a comment, before reading this. It is so very kind of you and so much appreciated. Thank you, Petro, but it is you who are so deserving of the award and we are so happy for you.

      Delete
  81. nice post!!!
    xoxo

    cappucinofrio.blogspot.com

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you. You have some wonderful images yourself!

      Delete
  82. oh what utterly fabulous photos.....they do brighten this dull dizzmal Tuesday...thank you!!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. We do agree. They are rather wonderful. And we are so sorry to learn that the weather continues to be gloomy and dismal for you. Hope for a better May!

      Delete
  83. Greetings Jane and Lance. It must be a treat to see all these early photographs in the exhibit. In the age of digital camera things have changed. You can do so many corrections to a bad picture and make it look good, thanks to "photoshop". Early photography was pure art, it was not only the shot itself but the dark room process was as important too. As a high school kid I worked in the darkroom of an advertising company and know how important it was to expose the film right. I remember all the excitement of looking at a picture appearing for the first time in a tray of developer.

    Best wishes

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. There is, as you say, something quite magical about the physical process of producing a photograph in the old fashioned way. For the early pioneers, arranging a photographic session must have been similar to planning a war campaign with so much equipment, technical support and lighting to organise.

      These days, the digital process has made everything simpler but, perhaps, creating a truly great image is still as elusive!!!

      Delete
  84. But there could be, Jane and Lance. I think that's what keeps us trying to take the perfect photograph, though we'll probably never even get close to it. A most interesting post about what must have been a fascinating exhibition.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. As you say, it is this search for the perfect composition, the special moment in time captured for ever that keeps us striving to do better with our photography. But, for us, we know that even in two lifetimes of trying we should probably never reach the heights of these early pioneers!

      Delete
  85. I have really enjoyed visiting your blog. The photos are wonderful especially the black and white of the fork. I teach drawing classes and have some of my students render forks, they don't particularly like the subject, but this photo brings forks into a whole different light. I just love the composition and the shadow. Beautiful!!!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you so much for signing up as a Follower. We are pleased to return the compliment to you.

      We too love the photograph of the fork and plate and can only hope that your students might find such an image a source of inspiration for their own work!

      Delete
  86. LOVELY PICS:) I really like your blog and I want to follow but I dont see twitter or facebook in here??

    If you want some swedish decor inspiration, you can check out my blog:)
    Have a great week.

    LOVE Maria at inredningsvis.se
    (Sweden)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. You have registered as a Follower on our blog and we have returned the compliment by signing up to you. We hope that you will continue to enjoy what we write.

      Your blog looks to be most interesting and also has many delicious images!

      Delete
  87. Fantastic collection of photos. I particularly love old black and whites. I have recently been going through my mother's old photos and although not professional shots, there are some amazing photos I hope to do something with.
    And as for myself, I love clicking away and trying to improve my photography.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Yes, black and white photographs have a great appeal for us too, Penny, and we are sure that you will find much of interest amongst your mother's old photographs.

      It can be rather addictive, we find, this search for the perfect picture. We have to keep reminding ourselves to be selective and to really look before shooting!!

      Delete
  88. Dear Jane and Lance,
    As always a captivating post. Please forgive me in not mentioning the names of the artists.
    They are all very impressive . Art has so many forms and shapes, the human body one of them.
    The dish and fork..so so simple, yet stands out.
    I enjoyed reading about these artists and seeing their work. The museum looks so impressive.
    kind regards
    val

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. As an artist yourself, Val, we know that you appreciate the many and varied ways in which a creative spirit can be expressed as Art. And yes, the fork and plate, two items so easily overlooked, can with an artistic eye be transported into something else entirely.

      We are so pleased that you have enjoyed the post. The Museum is indeed impressive and is well worth a visit when in Budapest.

      We see that your picture has appeared as our newest Follower although we have had the pleasure of your following for some time now. We assume it is all to do with some deeply scientific technology about which we know nothing.Welcome, again and again!!

      Delete
  89. How lovely to have the vicarious pleasure of seeing what looks like a wonderful exhibition through your blog! I loved each one of the photographs you chose here! It was interesting, too to read so many comments in addition to your own about the beauty of black and white photography. Coincidentally,both my sons have been developing their interest B&W in photography recently, and bemoaning the difficulty of getting 35mm film developed: difficult enough, but if it's black and white, it has to to to Germany these days...apparently.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. How interesting that your sons are experimenting with black and white photography and developing film. There can surely be no greater thrill than seeing the final image emerge from the bath of developing fluid. But, to have to send film to Germany, how extraordinary. It is all becoming as problematic as it was in the C19!!

      Thank you so much for your kind comment and for becoming our latest Follower. We are delighted that you have joined us and hope that you will continue to find what we write of interest.

      Delete
  90. Thanks for sharing the tour with us! Beautiful photos!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. It is a real pleasure. We are so pleased that you have enjoyed reading about the exhibition.

      Delete
  91. How interesting! I didn't know about those "Sicilian" pictures. What a perfect place to take them. Sicily and all its Roman heritage got like transported to a new dreamed era, hopefully a better one (new ideologies permitting).

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Indeed, we are now even more than ever intrigued to visit Sicily to see it all for ourselves. In fact the whole exhibition did much to widen our horizons.

      Delete
  92. Gorgeous.
    Those perfect young men look like sculpture.
    Funny, I wrote about O'Keeffe today.
    Or, Mrs. Steiglitz as she's sometimes known.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Yes, aren't they absolutely perfect, Pamela!

      How interesting that your thoughts are also centred on this most beguiling of artistic circles. Great minds....

      Delete
  93. Dear Jane and Lance,

    What an interesting exhibition you went too. It's the sort of exhibition we enjoy going to as well. We visited one recently on Eugene Atget and one on the history of the photobook. What is it about black and white photography, that makes it so interesting. It must be the feeling behind it too. I am familiar with the photo's by Steichen & Lartigue, but the ones by Wilhelm von Gloedon are new to me. How beautiful he captured the male body!

    Have a lovely evening!

    Madelief

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. We are so pleased that you enjoyed reading about the exhibition, which we thought to be excellent. We have never heard of Eugene Atget and so that is something new for us to look into too!!

      Black and white photography is so arresting, we find. Perhaps colour distracts from the composition and the contrast of light and shade? Whatever, black and white will always be our favourite.

      Hoping that your week is going well!

      Delete
  94. In days gone by photographs were composed and posed for. Today we snap at anything and everything.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Yes, it is rather too easy, in this digital age, to become snap happy!

      Delete
  95. Hello Jane and Lance, Thank you for this gift, that is what it is for someone who spends several hours a day looking at photographs (and hopefully learning from them!) I think the Steiglitz is particularly remarkable for its composition and visual narrative.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. This is most kind of you, Carol, for in your case there must reach the point of enough is enough, at least for one day, and to continue to look at photographs in this situation is surely beyond the call of duty!!

      Delete
  96. I've been taking photos since I was about 6 and have a considerable number but can probably think of a very small number indeed that I would class as art rather than as a moment of record alone. I enjoyed your choices.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. But so often one is taking a photograph for one of many reasons, seldom with a view to the picture becoming an art work. We are, however, delighted that you enjoyed these. Thank you.

      Delete
  97. Thank goodness technology has come a long way since those old fashioned plate cameras. Can you imagine having to place your head underneath a hood trying to get those leathery old flaps to open up in this day and age? Isn't photoshop a boon? Now, when I have my photograph taken with friends, I take advantage of Photoshop, using the paint brush effect to make my skin glow with health and give myself dazzling white teeth, with the interactive warp I can even make myself look a stone slimmer! It's like the Queen Mary 2 ocean liner coming into port surrounded by tugboats.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Darling Mitzi, we are certain that your natural beauty needs absolutely no 'touching up' by Photoshop or anything else for that matter. But,you are right, technology has indeed come a long way from the days of the early pioneer photographers.......how could we keep in touch without it?!!

      As for cruising, on the Queen Mary 2 or otherwise, we rather think that it is not for us!!

      Delete
  98. Such beauty captured in the blink of an eye!
    How wonderful that you've been able to visit such brilliant photographs, the posters outside are truly beautiful! I wonder what happens to them afterwards...
    Thank you SO much for posting these I've been transported!

    Hugs to you both
    Jane

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. What a good question, Jane, about the posters. We shall endeavour to find out as they really are very striking. However, finding a wall big enough to hang them on might well prove problematic as they are monumental!!

      We are delighted that you enjoyed the post and do so hope that your health is good.

      Delete
  99. Dear Jane & Lance, what a fascinating post and lucky you to get a private viewing, with guide, to such a prestigious exhibition. I love black and white photography from that era, definitely an art form and something that is perhaps lost now with digital cameras allowing us all to just snap away! Those beautiful young men are posed in true classical style - wonderful!

    Jeanne
    x

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. We feel very spoiled by our 'private views' and we have been lucky enough to have experienced several now under the very capable guidance of Angéla. It is so true that, with an informative guide one sees so much more than looking alone.

      The young men are posed so deliciously, we agree!

      Delete
  100. Oh, but you live your life so artfully, dear Jane and Lance!
    You are both such an inspiration...

    I adore photography. Those Sicilian men look like sculptures!
    To me, this art form is most intriguing. One not only needs to have "the eye" of seeing the everyday as art, but of course the ability to actually capture it with a camera!
    What a splendid exposition...thank you so much for sharing this.
    A lovely weekend to both of you,
    - Irina

    ReplyDelete

Your comments are warmly welcomed and appreciated. We shall reply to each one individually since we value establishing a dialogue. However, we do not publish anonymous comments.

On occasion when comments are in excess of 200, then it is necessary to click on 'Load More' to view all comments that have been left.