Monday, November 12, 2012

Trains of Thought

We should not consider ourselves, in the true sense of the word, to be collectors. Yes, of course, we can lay claim to a stamp collection dating from childhood, a coin collection inherited inadvertently from a parent, as well as a stack - call them a collection if you will - of 'World of Interiors' which, put simply, have been bought over many years and never discarded. But when it comes to Fabergé eggs, Meissen, Aubusson, Georgian silver and Queen Anne country houses, these have all, thus far, failed to materialise in any number.

looking upwards to the roof at Art Market Budapest on the evening of the VIP Private View

It was, therefore, with no particular thought in mind that we accepted an invitation to the VIP launch of 'Art Market 2012 Budapest' at the end of last week. Directed by a friend, Attila Ledényi, this exhibition seeks to promote in his words 'Emerging Stars of the Future' as represented by galleries from around the world.

representing the Várfok Gallery, Kristina Kovács stands beside the work of Ádám Hollós

And so it was that within this glittering firmament of talent our eyes alighted on one particular spot brightly shining outwards from the stand of our favourite Budapest gallery, 'Várfok'.

Ádám Hollós' 'Hermeneutika' has a directness, a force, even for us a brutality, which demands notice. Here in the drabness of the railway carriage, so representative of Eastern Europe and in particular of Hungary, a faltering democracy, a child draws in the wet and grime of the window. He is somehow unlikeable: a set, impassive face, a look of concentration, of introspection, does not endear him to us. Seated within the train, he draws a train. In time, perhaps, he will add to the graffiti on the carriage wall. Later, maybe, he will become the artist who paints the picture of a child in a carriage and, in so doing, will reinforce, again, the perpetual cycle of life.

'Hermeneutika' by Ádám Hollós - click to enlarge image if required
   
A close examination of the painting reveals powerful brush strokes whereby the paint runs downwards in streams of colour. In places, such as the boy's satchel, carelessly placed on the seat, there is a tactile quality whilst throughout the whole each layer, for this work is assuredly layered, the abstract comes into play. And then there remain the series of horizontal lines, each one signifying a plane at which what is seen recedes further, even into an unknown.

packed and ready for transport on the Várfok Gallery stand, Kristina telephones for a taxi  

And should this interpretation be incorrect, then we care not at all. For on Thursday evening we had spotted a star, emptied the piggy bank, hailed a taxi and brought home the start of a new collection.

Forget the Fabergé, we say! 

Please note [16th. November, 2012]: We shall, for a week or so, be without internet connection. However, we will much look forward to catching up with all our friends and Followers in the near future.

254 comments:

  1. "and Queen Ann country houses" what a fun but rather large collection that would be. Lovely but rather large.
    Somehow the start of your collection is rather wonderful.
    Empty piggy bank and all.

    cheers, parsnip

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    1. Sadly, we have yet to make a start on the collection of Queen Anne houses - rather large, yes, and also rather expensive and a little more than is normally to be found in the piggy bank!

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  2. If a failure to discard the flotsam amassed throughout one's life is tantamount to 'collection', then count me in as a collector!! But somehow, I fear that 'real' collectors are more actively acquisitive! And if that means more treasures like that intriguing work above, then bring it on!

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    1. Believe us, Red, we too could amass several 'collections' if we were to turn out drawers and cupboards but, as you say, such things most likely do not count where 'real' collectors are concerned.

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  3. That is indeed a powerful image, as is your description.

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    1. The painting itself is very powerful. For the moment we have to consider carefully where we might place it.

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  4. A great find! The first thing I noticed when I enlarged the picture is the cow, and then the man and woman underneath. I'll be thinking of this painting tonight, when I'll be on the train to Munich.

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    1. We are delighted, Meike, that you find the painting of interest. There is, we feel, much about it to give rise to endless speculation.

      Have an enjoyable and safe journey to Munich.

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  5. Quite marvelous, and how exciting to find this exhuberant painting! As a mad collector of too many collections to fathom (or count), I am an enthusiastic supporter of your acquisition. I am sure it will find pride of place in your Budapest aerie. Reggie

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    1. Your interest and enthusiasm for this is very much appreciated, Reggie. We know from your own posts that your collections are far more focussed than ours and, in truth, contain very many beautiful and desirable items.

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  6. I enjoyed your description of the perpetual cycle. At first glance the painting appears quite simple, then a closer look reveals so much detail, on the boy's trousers, for example.

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    1. We very much agree with you, Tracey, that an immediate impression of simplicity where the painting is concerned is but a cover for so much more, with so many details to be examined and thought about.

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  7. There is so very, very much to look at and think about in this painting. I found myself musing as to the almost marquetry quality of the boy's hair (and you are right, he is rather unlikeable) and on to the wonderful rendition of the grimy nature of the carriage walls. It's a work that looks simple but draws the eye around and around it.... Lucky you, it has found a good home.

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    1. What you say here, Cathy, about the eye being drawn around the painting is something which we also find to be very true. We are delighted, as you may imagine, to have found such an interesting Hungarian artist and one who is represented by an excellent Budapest gallery.

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  8. A good choice, I think. He looks older than the age of a boy, with lines on his face and a downturned mouth. He has lived a hard life yet he is he indulging in such an innocent pleasure as we all did when we were young, that is drawing on misty windows. Yes, so much in the work and very good art. By his name, I take it he is a local artist.

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    1. We do so agree with you that there is something very hard about the face of the boy in the painting. And of course, as you say, Andrew, the picture depicts something which more than likely belongs to all of our younger years. Yes, Hollós Ádám [to write the name in the Hungarian way] is a painter living and working in Budapest.

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  9. I'd say the same!
    What a great painting! I'm sure it will find it's place at your place : )

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    1. We value your opinion enormously, Demie, and are so pleased that you approve of and like the painting.

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  10. What a profoundly depressing picture. Such a great air of hopelessness in that scene.

    If that were mine it would serve to constantly remind me to count my blessings and be deeply grateful for my life.

    Having said that, I don't mean to imply that I think it's a dreadful painting. Not at all, I can quite see why you were drawn to it and bought it. Brilliant start to any collection.

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    1. We have not misunderstood your comment at all, Wendz, and very much appreciate what you say about the painting. In any case, we do not expect everyone to like it and value all opinions equally.

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  11. Dear Jane and Lance, what a compelling painting, I am sure it will give you much pleasure. The start of a new collection is always exciting and a wonderful voyage of discovery.

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    1. There is something very 'compelling', as you say, about this particular painting and we are so pleased that you have found it of interest.

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  12. I love the surprise of all of this, the painting itself (for their is definitely something quietly astonishing in the act of taking it in) and that you both had to have it! I am quite fascinated by it and can imagine that your spot on perceptions will deepen and/or shift over time. I will look forward to knowing that you have found just the right place for him.
    Gros, gros bisous from your sleepy friend in Arles,
    H.

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    1. As yet, Heather, we have not found the final resting place for the painting which, on account of its size and weight, requires the wall to be drilled [something which neither of us would even begin to consider doing ourselves!!]. But you are so right, for we certainly expect that our view and interpretation of it will alter over time which will, of course, add to the interest and pleasure.

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  13. Yes I agree there is a lot of emotion there, I congratulate on your purchase :). IT was worth emptying the piggy bank :)). Jane and Lance, I used to be a journalist writing about cultural events, I must say the writing of this posts greatly reminds me of the style of a journalist. Is any of you a journalist? Kisses.

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    1. We are so pleased, Petronela, that you find Ádám Hollós' painting of interest. We know that it will continue to give us a great deal of pleasure. As it happens, neither of us has any connection with journalism. Our subjects are, in fact, English [Lance] and Mechanical Engineering [Jane] and the blog, which constitutes most writing we do nowadays, is totally a joint, shared activity with, we trust, the seams not appearing too visible!

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  14. Congratulations on your acquisition! We've just re-decorated the front room and hung a 'gallery wall' of 'pieces' gathered from around the house and dredged out of the attic. Mostly needlework done by myself and my mother, paintings by mom and other family members, some charcoal drawings of places and then a collection of frames I liked ages ago but never filled... It was fun to put up, but I've since discovered other possible sources and am thinking my house may have to say good-bye to all those blank walls!

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    1. We absolutely love the sound of your 'gallery' wall and particularly the way in which it combines the very personal, in the way of needlework pictures worked by you and your mother, with pieces from other sources. In our main hall on a ledge at the top of the panelling we have a collection of old, empty frames which can, or so we think, look most interesting.

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    2. Yes! I do love that idea...which we may use yet, the lower right corner of our grouping seems to be lacking something...

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    3. In the absence of pictures, empty frames make a good alternative we think. We got the idea from our framer who has a range of empty frames on display on a shelf around his shop and they look really good!

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  15. How simply marvellous. I think yours is a well observed, thought out interpretation of the piece and if, as you say, not in line with what others see, who cares! Art is entirely subjective. What works for one is hated by another. I could certainly live with this piece, maybe not in the bedroom, but certainly in a daytime space. Now methinks much debate will follow as to where to hang it.

    How exciting, a new collection begins. Many years ago when eBay first started there were many self representing artists selling from eastern block countries. All young talented people who found an avenue to sell to the world. Bidding was fierce on many pieces and I was fortunate enough to have won many. They are now sitting in my storage unit, waiting for us to get back to dry land to once again hang in a home. I can't wait. There is something wonderful about being surrounded by others talents.

    Congratulations. I feel this will be the first of many. It is so addictive.
    Di
    xxxxx

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    1. That art, as you so rightly say, is subjective is something with which we entirely agree. What for us is important is that for any work of art to succeed, then it should be able to promote lively debate, discussion and a range of opinion.

      Your collection of art from Eastern Europe sounds most interesting. In our view there is a great deal of talent yet to be discovered in countries which previously were outside of the main stream. Perhaps you may post on this at some point in the future with what you have waiting in storage?

      We very much hope to acquire further work by Ádám Hollós and already have our eyes on another painting. Watch this space!!

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  16. Dear Jane & Lance,
    Perhaps we should leave the collecting of houses to the likes of Bernie Ecclestone and his family?
    I the meantime, your new addition is quite wonderful, and very thought provoking. My immediate thought was of a boy being taken somewhere that makes him uneasy, and he is drawing familiar things to ease his concern and close off from the world around him. Whatever the interpretation one may get from it, you have a piece that should take pride of place somewhere.

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    1. Possibly that is very good advice, Gary. We shall leave well alone!!

      Your interpretation of the painting is most interesting and provides us with further food for thought. We imagine that we shall continue to look at it for a long time to come and continue to discover new meaning. And now we need to find it a permanent home.

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  17. Congratulations on your acquisition. I understand too well the magnetic power a piece of art has to draw us in and make us empty our piggy banks. It's a wonderfully powerful painting, by someone very talented. I can see why it has such a strong appeal for you.

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    1. Thank you. We are naturally delighted that this painting is of interest to you too. We consider Ádám Hollós to be a very talented young artist and all of his work that we have seen so far appeals to us enormously.

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  18. Isn't a wonderful moment when you first cast eyes on a picture and you know that you want to live with it for ever and can afford to.

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    1. Absolutely. It is a very special moment and one which, happily for the bank balance, does not happen as a daily occurrence.

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  19. Dear Jane and Lance - This painting contains so many elements that I dislike - graffiti, neglect, dullness and boredom, but it is so mesmerising and cleverly painted. How, for example did Ádám Hollós successfully manage to create that steamed up window with the boy's finger nonchalantly drawing images? - very clever. I believe that you have chosen well.

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    1. Likewise for us too, Rosemary, the painting depicts so many aspects of life which are increasingly prevalent and which one so dislikes and yet, as you point out, it is extraordinarily well painted, in particular the steamed up, grimy window, and as such carries with it so very many messages open to a variety of interpretations. We believe the artist, Ádám Hollós, to have enormous talent and are not at all surprised that he should be represented by one of Budapest's leading, and oldest, galleries.

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  20. Hello Jane and Lance, The very name Hermeneutika invites the viewer to interpretation, assuming that the word means the same as it does in English. Your description is dead-on, but in the hermeneutic spirit I'll add a few comments. The mostly dark scene frames the large window, emphasizing its importance. However, "the world" is not visible outside, just another train possibly going in the opposite direction (as does the cow), and then a brick wall, so that even the window does not offer much relief from the boy's confinement.

    The seat opposite the rider seems larger because of the angle of the painting, and it is also the object closest to the viewer. In fact, if there are four seats, the viewer could be seated in the fourth one. The fact that the seat facing the boy is empty might signify a missing person or even a death, which could account for the somber mood.

    This brings us to the drawings on the window, and a more extreme mode of speculation. Male and female adults are walking out of the frame of the picture with big smiles and with arms outstretched, as though no longer living and going to some heavenly reward (perhaps hermeneutics is used in its more narrow sense of biblical interpretation). The train drawn on the window can symbolize the journey of life.

    Very interesting also is the white box, the brightest object in the painting and which vies with the window as the main focus. Since its tone is opposite to the overall dark mood, it perhaps is some Pandora's box allowing us to hope that things will work out for this boy.

    Sorry for this novel-length comment; one can go on all day when a masterful artist like this invokes both our sympathy and intellectual involvement in the painting.
    --Road to Parnassus

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    1. Far from 'going on', this is a most perceptive and, if we may say, erudite comment which gives a great deal more insight into the painting and covers more ground than so far to date. What you say here we find enormously of interest and are in total agreement with this very detailed interpretation. The Greek word 'Hermeneutika' does, indeed, translate into English as you suggest and it is, or so we feel, surely the deliberate purpose of the artist, Ádám Hollós, that we should consider the work in a variety of ways and draw our own conclusions as to meaning and intention.

      We had speculated at some length about the significance of the white rubbish container which is central to the picture and which, on account of its much lighter colouring, does indeed invite comment. Your reference to some kind of Pandora's box provides further food for thought although by tradition such a container when opened is more likely to release sorrow rather than hope.

      Whatever, we do so very much appreciate your taking the time and trouble to comment in such detail, Jim, and many of the points which you make we shall hope to take up and discuss with the artist himself when, as we expect, we meet with him in the near future.

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  21. I do love the painting and actually find the boy endearing - it's very difficult to portray a person's inner world in painting, and this artist succeeds very well. When I look at it I feel that I AM that boy, going on a journey, who knows where? But making his mark, focussed, intent on coping...it will, I am sure give you many many hours of pleasure.

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    1. We are so very pleased that you like the painting even though our feelings about the boy may be rather different. But then all art is open to interpretation and this painting, as its title suggests, is certainly no exception.

      We are confident, when we have found the right placement, that we will enjoy the work for many years to come.

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  22. Hello there...you can see my new blog here:

    http://laviedunenouvellefemme.blogspot.co.uk/

    It's just started, so I'm still working on it. But, I'll still have my first blog too. The new one is more a lifestyle blog and won't have anything about me on it. My first blog is my personal blog :) xx

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  23. Art that inspires us to live is always wonderful - no matter its form or style.

    Well done you, supporting upcoming artists

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    1. We do so agree with your comment here. Indeed the theme of the whole 'Art Market Budapest 2012' has been to heighten awareness of new and upcoming talent.

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  24. Oh Jane and Lance ......what a wonderful painting and such a lovely piece to start your collection........I wouldn't say that I know a great deal about art ( even though I did get Art A-Level and wanted to go to Art School !!) but, I know what I like and I really love that painting. It says so much, doesn't it ?
    I. too, have my childhood stamp collection and I also have my Dad's stamp collection. but that is where the collections stop in our household !!!! Over the years we have just accumulated things that please us, usually silly little things but they all have a little memory attatched to them, much like yourselves I imagine.
    Enjoy your painting and I'm sure that you will now be on the lookout for more pieces to add to your new collection ! XXXX

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    1. Jackie, this is so very, very generous of you and we are so thrilled that you are so enthusiastic about Ádám Hollós' work. We too think that it carries so much in the way of meaning as well as, for us, so typifying certain aspects of Hungarian life.

      When it comes to collections we are very much the same - an eclectic mix of things which we like and treasure and which have association. We should not actually wish it to be any other way.

      As and when we can afford it, we may well be tempted to add to our Hollós collection!!

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  25. I think you will spend many hours pondering this painting. There are so many levels to think about aren't there? It's not a joyful painting but one to be still and contemplate, the boy, the train, the window, the graffiti...so many elements...the colours, the style, the time and place..all interesting.

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    1. What appealed to us initially, Carol, was, as you say, the many different levels of the painting with much to look at and consider. We are sure that as time goes by we shall find many new and different aspects of the work.

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  26. For me, this post is less about the actual painting than your joy in the discovery of an artist whose subject and style have captured your imagination. I remember the piece that started my parents' collection so many years ago - also a painting of a boy and one that fostered the sort of discussion that had not, until then, been much a part of our lives.

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    1. This is probably very true,and we do appreciate your thinking about it in this light. For we should wish, if nothing else, for our genuine enthusiasm for this painting, and Ádám Hollós' work in general, to be apparent. Thank you.

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  27. Good for you; art should be collected if it speaks to you and it seems you have found a piece that does, delving into the process and thoughts behind the art, you are right in emptying the piggy bank to obtain this piece. So many times I have wanted a painting only to return and it be sold so first impressions are to be acted upon before it's too late. Luckily I have very little wall space here or I would have a ton of paintings and no money for food.

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    1. We are so heartened to read this comment of yours, Linda, which confirms to us that to buy a painting almost on impulse is no bad thing and, in this instance, we are so certain that it will provide us with much future pleasure.

      As yet we have to decide where it is to be hung - it is rather on the large size!!

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  28. You did a nice purchase, Jane and Lance. I like your interpretation of the painting. I think there’s no correct or incorrect interpretation but likes or dislikes. You must have had a BIG piggy bank full of big coins like Japanese 500 yen coin. Enjoy your new collection.

    Yoko

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    1. We do so agree with you. Yoko, that there can be no correct or incorrect interpretation of the painting, or possibly any other art work. Alas, our piggy bank was not as full as we should have liked for we should have been very happy to have made several purchases.

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  29. Hello Jane and Lance

    A typical representation of any child travelling by train, bus or car, sitting next to a window covered in condensation. Unfortunately, it is not unusual to see graffiti around railway stations all over Europe but it is unusual for me to see it depicted inside the carriage of a train.

    I know very little about art but I know what I like when I see it. I would never purchase art as an investment but as something that touches me and gives me pleasure to look at.

    For many years I would avoid private galleries as I felt they were rather uninviting places and rather pretentious.

    A number of years ago, after some persuasion, I did rather awkwardly attend a gallery viewing, with absolutely no intentions of making a purchase. However, I was immediately touched by a particular painting, and by the back story of the artist, that I left the gallery having happily made my first art purchase. Possibly of no more value today than when I made my purchase - but pleasing to my eyes every day.

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    1. When it comes to purchasing art, or indeed anything else, we would never, and have never, done so as an investment. That way, we think, lies foolishness and folly. Besides, why would one wish to sell one's possessions unless in absolutely dire straits?

      Sadly, many Hungarian trains are now covered inside and out with graffiti, something which would not have been the case before the regime change.

      Your story of attending an exhibition and making a purchase is one with which we readily identify. There are certain times in life when something touches one unexpectedly.

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  30. 'Hermeneutika' by Ádám Hollós speaks to me of a kind of quiet melancholic wistful loneliness and even alienation. A child going off to school or perhaps coming home. I like it. A lot. What better to collect than great art!

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    1. Of course, as we are certain you will have found also, Rubye Jack, even the title of this work is so very suggestive of so much. And then there is the painting itself. We are so pleased that you like it.

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  31. I LOVE your purchase and know you will derive much pleasure from the painting. It is very strong in subject and the colors are beautiful. Where will it hang? Please share with us again when it has found a special wall. I believe this boy is on his way to or from school and daydreaming about the future travels he will take around this vast and wonderful world. One of my favorite paintings ever is of a girl on a train........I must re-blog on that soon when I can find some time!

    So dear friends.............hopefully you are not quite back in Venice, literally swimming in San Marco and paddling about in hip waders! Wow, what water yesterday - those pics had us grateful we were so lucky with the beautiful weather while there recently. Now we truly feel for the lovely shopkeepers we befriended who told us they are often flooded during acqua alta.........they must be in dire straits at present with this 6th highest flood in history!
    By the way, did I tell you how much I loved Venice and must go back some day.

    Mary

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    1. We are so pleased that you like the painting too. As each day passes we see more and are sure that there are depths to this painting that we have still yet to discover. What fun we hope to have in making further discoveries. It is so heavy that, at the moment, it is propped on top of a bookcase. That in itself was a feat of engineering and strength to achieve!!!

      We do hear disturbing reports from Venice about the level of the flood waters at the moment which seem to have reached record highs.Wellington boots will most certainly be packed as we shall not be put off frequenting our favourite haunts. We are thrilled that you enjoyed Venice and are sure that its special magic will call you back again and again!!

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  32. Good Morning Jane and Lance

    I say worth spending every penny from the piggy bank on this masterpiece. I am drawn into the image and you so clearly describe the painting and the linear lines, atmospheric perspective and the richness of texture reserved for the foreground of the painting. The familiarity of the subject evokes memories of travelling on the English trains in my early years. There was often a young child drawing images on the interior window which always was foggy from smoke and pollution. I think we all were that child.
    Looking forward to seeing Hermeneutika in place in your home.

    Wishing you a week of sunsine

    Helen xx

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    1. Dearest Helen, we are so delighted that you like the painting which is, in fact, growing more interesting to us every day. Fortunately, not every penny from the piggy bank was spent but we can well see that further raids may be necessary to purchase further works which have also caught our attention.

      Yes, we are sure that you are right in that we have all at some points in our lives been that child. Lost in our own thoughts and travelling in our imagination goodness knows where. Some of us never grow up.....

      Cold and raining here today in Budapest but we hope that the sun is shining on you!!!

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  33. Dearest Jane and Lance,
    I love your interpretation of the painting. I gather you purchased it!! It is a rather sad yet hopeful painting to me. The child seems very sad . . . perhaps hurt is hidden within the scribbles on the window. There is also joy within those finger drawings. The abstract qualities and bleak colors add so much intrigue. I think you are right in thinking you have begun a collection of an up and coming star. It is a wonderful painting.

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    1. Yes,Carol, the painting does appear to be a strange mixture of hope and sorrow, perhaps therein lies something of its appeal for us. The drawings on the window offer so many variations of interpretation which all adds to the painting's intrigue, we think.

      We look forward to talking about the painting with you in person, dearest Carol, and, hopefully, you will have advice about where we should hang it?!!!!!

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    2. OH! What a joy it will be!! What fun and celebration of life and art. It was a thrill to speak with you today! Until Venice then . . .

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    3. A bad line, but still wonderful. Until Venice!!

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  34. You all made a fine decision to attend the exhibit. Once there, you all made a very fine decision to follow your response to that painting with its purchase.

    You will have given Mr Holles encouragement and given yourselves endless opportunities to contemplate the painting's style, technique, content and meaning. This would seem to be a wise investment.

    I was curious to see other examples of Holles' work, but could could not find them on the Varfok Galeria website. Perhaps the gallery will eventually add some images?

    (It has also been so interesting to read earlier comments from your readers. These have enhanced my own appreciation of your collection. I do note that no one has mentioned the famous train journey from the film The Lady Vanishes!)

    xo

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    1. Yes, Frances, we are already feeling that the painting has given hours of enjoyment through debate and discussion between ourselves and with friends. Everyone sees something new which is such a joy. It seems as if the painting speaks to people in very different ways and elicits a wide range of interpretations and thoughts.

      You can find other examples of Ádám Hollós's work on the 'Varfok Project Room' [on Facebook] site. This is a recent extension to the gallery and is used for exhibiting the work of new or emerging artists. Adám Hollós's work was given an introductory exhibition in April of this year and images from that event are posted on the site.Later this month we shall visit the gallery to meet the artist and see more of his work, something to which we are very much looking forward.

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  35. I so agree, Jane and Lance. This is a picture which will repay the emptying of your piggy bank for the rest of your lives, while a Fabergé egg would just languish in the bank for safekeeping. You have a true collector's eye for what is really worth possessing.

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    1. How right you are about the Fabergé egg. We already have the tiaras and diamonds in the bank vaults, so there really would not be room for more!!!!!!!!

      Already we feel that the painting has given so much to us by way of interest and stimulating thought. We are certain that we shall continue to see more each time we look and that, for us, is priceless!

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  36. I am quite taken with this painting, and thoroughly enjoyed your description/discussion of it. (Perhaps one of you is a secret art critic?) At first glance it is reminiscent of the work of Edward Hopper-the sense of inwardness and solitude, the shadows, the bleakness...There is so much to contemplate. I am fascinated by those streams of color (and how well the graffiti works on it), and also the complex coloration on the arms of the opposite seat, and the window is brilliant.

    I don't know what to think about the child, whether he is unlikable or not, sad or bored, or all of those things. Hopper's figures were sort of like that--there is almost a neutrality about them. I don't remember Hopper painting children. It is unusual for an artist to resist painting a child as cute or appealing.

    Truly a work of art, it was worth every penny. I would love to see more of his paintings.

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    1. One of us did, for a time, work in the Fine Art business so, perhaps, that has come through in this post.

      We can see exactly what you mean about the Hopper qualities in this painting, an artist, incidentally whom we much admire. The feeling of isolation, darkness and strong sense of place are very much evident in his work and in this painting.And yes, the child appears to be a major difference and an essential part of this composition.

      If you care to google the Varfok Project Room site, which is also on Facebook, you will find other examples of Ádám Hollós's work which is from an introductory exhibition held in April of this year. We are so pleased that you like the painting too.

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    2. I just spent some time on the Facebook page and will return there again. His paintings are so intriguing and varied, there is much to think about. One thing I noticed is that your painting is larger than I realized. You did include a photo of it with a person, but the scale did not quite register with me. Such a deep and impressive piece.

      I am going to have to visit Eastern Europe--it seems like a good fit for me.

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    3. Oh, Jen, we are so pleased that you have taken the time to seek out the Facebook page and delighted that you have enjoyed exploring the world of Ádám Hollós.

      Our painting measures 80cm by 120cm so is quite large but is by no means the largest of his works. In addition, it is painted on board so is very heavy. We have to say that we were amazed at how Kriszti could carry it some distance to the awaiting taxi. She did announce that she was strong!!!

      As for visiting Eastern Europe, there will always be a warm welcome awaiting you here in Budapest!!

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    4. Thank you, my dear friends.

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    5. We really mean it. A guest bedroom [with its own bathroom]awaits!!

      Delete
  37. Dear Jane and Lance,
    Congratulations on your fabulous aquisition! It is, indeed a wonderful painting. I so admire the way you've thought about this picture, the story told not only by the image, but also by the artist's marks on the canvas. This is the way we should all live and engage with our pictures. I'm sure you will enjoy it for many years to come. Any artist would be lucky to have his/her work find its way into a home as appreciative as yours--bravo Jane and Lance!
    Warm regards,
    Erika

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    1. Just once in a while, serendipity brings one into contact with something which connects in a deeply personal way. So it was with this painting. One can never quite tell why this should be so, but one knows that one wants to live with it as it offers an ongoing dialogue with us, its viewers.

      We know that you,Erika, as an artist yourself, are passionate about Art. We are, therefore, thrilled that you appreciate the painting too. It means a great deal. Thank you so much for this most kind and generous comment.

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  38. Art is not about beauty. Art is about story. If you find something that tells you a story you cannot forget, you connect and it becomes beautiful, or at least important to you. Congratulations on finding the story in the painting and making it your own.

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    1. Dearest Helen, how beautifully you express the connection with Art and the story that it tells, and how perfectly this sums up our relationship with this work.

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  39. Its a beautiful picture i don't always get art it has to be said i like pictures that tell a story or one that is a pleasure on the eye and the mind and this is lovely. Enjoy, dee x

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    1. If a work makes a connection in whatever way, then that is the essence of Art, since, without that connection or ability to tell a story, it is merely decoration in our view. Thank you, Dee, for your kind comment.

      Delete
  40. Dear Jane and Lance - Congratulations on your purchase! I think that you will continue to find new interpretations and hidden surprises in your find, and that will be half the pleasure of owning it.

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    1. Yes, Mark, we are sure that you are right in this regard. And, indeed, that really is the thrill of owning it. In addition, it speaks so very powerfully to us of Eastern Europe and is the first painting we have owned that has made this particular connection so strongly.

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  41. Dear Jane and Lance,

    As I read your post I was thinking to myself what an interesting and thought provoking painting that is so I was pleased to find you have bought it.

    I like your 'circle of life' interpretation of this work. I like the way a fairly mundane topic can be made to make a connection with the viewer.

    In looking at this particular piece I am reminded of the work of the Australian artist John Brack. I admire his work such a lot!

    Now, where is your new purchase going to hang?

    Kirk

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    1. Dear Kirk, we are so pleased to have been introduced by you to the work of John Brack. And, yes, we too can see the similarities between the work of these artists, especially the use of the everyday and mundane as a setting and vehicle through which more complex ideas and thoughts can be conveyed.

      At the moment, the painting is propped on top of the bookcase in the Drawing Room. It is too heavy to hang on the wall without some drilling etc. and we are sure that you will readily appreciate that our DIY skills are just not up to this. So, it is propped but this may not be its permanent home. Indeed, we are already eyeing up another of Ádám Hollós's works [equally heavy and larger]so more permanent solutions will have to be found!!!!

      Delete
  42. I am sure your new acquisition looks splendid in your apartment. The only thing we collect are books -- most everything else has been donated or gotten rid of in some way but books....seems like we collecting bookcases too!

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    1. The painting certainly has a presence in the Drawing Room. However, whether that will be its permanent place remains to be decided.

      We do not think of our books as a collection, more a way of life!!!! They are everywhere. Indeed, a set of shelves fell off the wall just recently under the weight of the books placed on them. We have a serious book problem here!!!!

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  43. For a brief moment I thought you were both model railway enthusiasts. The painting, erm, yes, now my train of thought has been de-railed.

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    1. And, once upon a time, dearest Mitzi, we thought you were a shy, retiring and innocent girl.........

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  44. Love that painting !!!...thanks for share darling....love Ria...xxx....

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    1. Thank you, Ria, we are pleased that you have enjoyed looking at the painting. Hoping that you are well and enjoying your day!

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  45. Dear Jane and Lance,
    the painting is so interesting - and I always think when somethings 'hums' at you, and the possibility is there to get it, one should buy. Otherwise one regrets it. We are both no collectors - though Husband once made an exhibition on collectors (of all sorts, though I am pretty sure there was none among them collecting manors :-) - and they were a very special species.
    Enjoy your thrilling painting!

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    1. Dear Britta, you are so right. We saw the painting at the VIP Private View on the Wednesday and returned hastily on the Thursday to buy it.We did nothing but talk about it having seen it and, so, not to have bought it would have surely led to regrets in the future.

      Your husband's exhibition about collectors and their collections sounds most intriguing. We can well imagine that they are a rare species and all the more exciting because of it.

      Thank you, enjoy we shall!!

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  46. No bejewelled eggs! That is truly a disappointment....I thought that they would be laying (ho ho) in the Queen Anne pile just along the coast. I do love the painting though - a piece of art that delivers something a little different each time you view it.
    Venice update - you may need to take a little inflatable with you!
    I am sure you will optimise your trip in true Hattatt fashion.
    Best wishes
    Jenny

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    1. Dear Jenny,we really try to steer clear of eggs since our unfortunate experience with keeping hens in our gardening days in Herefordshire. We started with three glamorous Black Rock chicken and the sad ending to it all was when the final one had to be carted away for intensive care in the bottom oven of an AGA. It is a long and complicated story of which these are the edited highlights. Suffice to say that eggs were shop bought from that point on, although the taste was nowhere near so good!!!

      We are so pleased that you like the painting which does, as you say, delight with new surprises at every viewing.

      Our water wings are packed, dear Jenny, but we are wondering whether the wellingtons need upgrading to waders?!!!!

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  47. Dear Jane and Lance, congratulations on such an interesting find. Your description of the cycle is quite thought-provoking, and it reminds me of something called 'metafiction' in literature. This story within a story aspect is always so fascinating, which this painting greatly illustrates. I'm sure you'll continue to unravel its themes and plots, which I can sense are many, as you bask in the glory of its ownership.

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    1. There is, as you say, a wonderful parallel here between Art and Literature as the story within the story unfolds. And, what is always so beguiling is the way in which individual interpretation can lead to so many twists and turns along the way and so many alternative endings.

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  48. Oh, oh - in my haste I had not realised that you had bought the painting. Stupendo!! Bella!

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    1. Yes, cash has been exchanged. Bellissima, allegro, avanti!!!

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  49. how exciting.....it's so thrilling to hang a picture you love upon ypur own wall, there to look at whenever you want!!

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    1. You are right, it is exciting. And, of course, it varies in different lights and different times of the day and so is constantly changing.

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  50. What a lovely first collectors piece. :) I think the brush strokes show the meaning behind the picture most of all. I love how you can get a sense of feeling the artist had when he was painting through this, and the interesting set of colours to boot. :D A fabulous choice indeed!

    Hugs,

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    1. We rather think that you may be correct in saying that this is the first of a collection since we have already seen other works by this artist that appeal. Oh dear, where will it all end?

      We are most interested to read what you say about the brush strokes and agree that they are essential to the piece. They give movement and intensity and do give an insight into the areas of the painting where the artist particularly focussed his attention.

      You are so creative yourself, Katherine, that we are pleased that you like the painting too.

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  51. Your description and interpretation of the painting is wonderful. What a shame some of your collections aren't as large as you would wish!
    Sarah x

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    1. Well, we have to say that, with regret, the Queen Anne Country House collection never really got off the ground. Not a single one ....... none.... nothing.... nil... zero.......but we are patient people!!!!

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  52. The painting is incredible. What a great start to a collection... or as the one and only. Congratulations.

    I had no idea how limited you were in your collections of fine things. I'm shipping three of my Queen Anne houses right away.

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    1. We know that you are a keen Art lover, Mitch, and so we are delighted that you like the painting.The piggy bank may yet be raided again, since we have already seen other work by this artist which we very much like.

      You are too generous, Mitch, with your house offer, but, as we have no wish to disappoint, we accept wholeheartedly!!!!They are not self-assembly are they....only our DIY skills are severely limited!!!

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  53. Dear Jane and Lance, an impressive painting. I find it diffficult to appreciate the beauty of it by just seeing a photo, and for me it seems rather dark, melancholic. I do enjoy to read your thoughts about it, and all the comments. I'm not a connoisseur, not at all, but I do believe that a painting has to touch your heart, and so did this to yours. I used to visit galleries with a colleague/friend, who's a painter besides being a nurse, and I always learned a lot, looking at another way to paintings.
    You will certainly enjoy this, groetjes, Gerda

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    1. To see the painting at first hand and to appreciate the many layers and textures are, we feel, essential in appreciating the full impact of this work. This is certainly not easily grasped from a photograph.

      We too feel that it is rather a dark and sombre work, the colour palette alone is distinctly gloomy. This is all very reminiscent of place and time in our view and is, for us at least, representative of many of the aspects of the Hungary that we see today.

      We could not own a painting with which we have no connection, for that is very important for us with all the things that we find ourselves surrounded by.This one certainly does move us in ways that perhaps one does not fully understand but which one appreciates nevertheless.

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  54. Hello Jane and Lance. What a lovely find. Sometimes the snap decisions we make are the best ones. Enjoy.
    Patricia x

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    1. Sometimes one instinctively feels that one must leap first and think later, otherwise the moment is lost for ever.Of course, one may regret at leisure, but that is the excitement of Life!!

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  55. I for one, Jane and Lance, am glad you've taken the plunge; new art would scarcely exist if no-one had the courage to follow their feeling and take a risk in buying it.
    I like your 'Hermeneutika' very much - a window onto a private moment. For all its grittiness, it seems to be a painting about dreaming, about possibility.

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    1. Dearest Faisal,we love your description of the 'window onto a private moment'as that seems to be the essence of the piece.What are the dreams, the possibilities, we wonder, and what are the disappointments and the lost hopes?

      Perhaps there are as many possibilities as there are viewers' opinions. Indeed, are all our dreams only limited by the scope of our imaginations?

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  56. Congratulations to you both on such a glorious work of art!
    I do see much hope there..the child is creating...dreaming...thinking...
    I always wonder about the intent and message
    of the artist. What truly matters, though, is how it touches us, the viewers...
    Fascinating to read your, as well as your readers', interpretations.
    An exciting, dynamic start to your collection! Enjoy!!!
    Hugs from Minnesota,
    - Irina

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    1. How wonderful, Irina, that you see hope and creativity amongst the gloom. Although we have never met you, this would seem to us to be a summation of your gloriously positive view of the world. And, you are absolutely right, what matters is how the viewer is moved by the work. Is one's life enhanced in any way, does one think differently, is there an emotional connection?.....if there is, then one can truly say that one has come into contact with Art.

      Yes, Irina, we too think that this may be just the start for there are several other works by this artist which have captured our imaginations. Dreaming....thinking......!!!!

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  57. Glad to be returning many hours after first looking at the post. Excellent mixture of comments and responses to the piece.

    I'm sure if you had to guess, you'd just know I love this work by Ádám Hollós. So much is going on in that claustrophobic space. I'm inclined to think the boy is not responsible for the finger doodles, he's just tempted to add to them in his pensive and perhaps morose state of boredom. I'd find out his story if I was sitting nearby!

    This is a timeless piece, modern yet classic - the trouser creases look like a digital effect, yet the scene looks quite difficult to date.

    I'm glad this painting has gone to a good home, and look forward to an update should you meet Hollós soon.

    Lucy s

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    1. Dearest Lucy, yes, at a guess, we should have thought that you would have chosen to take this picture home too.That delights us!

      That is a most interesting point about the finger doodles. Some of these could only have been created from the opposite seat as they face the other way. And, we thought that some of the images were too childish for this boy who appears to be a teenager rather than a small child who might have been responsible. of course, we need you sitting opposite to him to find all of this out and, we are quite certain that in a matter of moments, his life history would have been laid bare!

      To be able to see the painting at close quarters would be to really appreciate all the fine detail, textural layering and abstract collages which make up the various components of the picture.The way in which the grimy mist of the window has been depicted is masterful in our view.

      To see more of Hollós's work, google the Varfok Project Room site on Facebook where an exhibition of his work in April of this year is to be found.Thank you, Lucy, for taking the time and trouble to comment in such detail. You are most generous and kind.

      Delete
  58. Jane and Lance, it is always awesome to find something you would like to collect... picking beautiful and thought provoking items are the way to go... something that will always make you think.

    I love how you are so cultured:)

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    1. Things that one sees every day really need to be chosen with care we feel since they can make such a difference to one's mood.

      You are always so very generous, Launna, and we are grateful.

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  59. Dear Jane and Lance,

    Your posts often have the effect to put a smile on my face! The painting looks really special. You described very well what it was that made the painting stand out for you. It does look a bit grim indeed and the boy unhappy, but I realise that's just why it appealed to you so much. It makes me wonder though where you will put it?!

    Have a lovely new week!

    Madelief xox

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    1. Well, as you know, we still await the Georgian silver and the Queen Anne country houses, but we are blessed with so many other treasures, including delightful friends such as you and J that we are rich indeed!!!

      Out of the many hundreds of paintings on display at the Art Market, this one simply made a connection with us. We have looked at the works of many Hungarian artists over recent years but this is the first that has been both affordable and desirable. We are delighted to have acquired it and find new things revealed in it every day.

      At present it is propped on the top of the bookcase in the Drawing Room, replacing the stuffed fox!!!!

      Thinking of you and J. Love,J and L xx

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  60. There is something about that painting which spoke to me. Perhaps it's the faraway look on the child's face. He seems so concentrated as he doodles. It reminds me a bit of myself, when I get completely absorbed in something I am doing. Perhaps it brings out the child in all of us.

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    1. From the many and varied comments we have received thus far, it would seem that the child resonates with so many of us in so many different ways. Perhaps he is the child we were, or wished to be or tried not to be? Whatever, what is important is that the painting spoke something to you as indeed it did to us.

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  61. Your piggy bank has been raided to a good purpose....giving not only yourselves but any number of your readers the pleasure of making the acquaintance of a work of art.

    Our piggy bank has its curly tail between its legs if we go to exhibitions....it never knows the moment when it will be called upon to disgorge...

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    1. We smiled at the thought of the piggy bank with the tail between its legs!! Although we do see a lot of Art exhibitions, we only seldom wish to actually own a piece. On those rare occasions, our minds are usually made up for us by a prohibitively expensive price, but, this time, we were lucky!

      Delete
  62. Oh, excellent news, Jane and Lance. Now you are art collectors AND you've apparently discovered a new artist to collect. I like your description of the painting by Adam Hollos and I don't blame you for being smitten enough to buy.

    I'm studying the painting and wondering if there's also some collage work going on in the window frame?

    Will you show us it hanging on your wall once you have it framed and matted?

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    1. How generous of you, Yvette, to think of us as 'art collectors' which, of course, we are not although we are tempted to acquire more of Ádám Hollós' work when funds permit.

      We can readily understand your wondering if the painting is part collage for it has a very tactile quality in places. In fact it is entirely painted.

      As yet we are undecided where it is to hang but we think it unlikely that we shall have it framed, preferring it as it is.

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  63. Jane and Lance...I did enlarge the photograph to get a better perspective of the textures and strokes. I wish I could view it in person. The finger drawings on the fogged window are amazing. I am sure you do not need my opinion, however you emptied the piggy bank for a very nice piece. I am going to spend more time with it. Thank you!

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    1. It was the grimy, misted up window which first attracted us to the painting, Bonnie, which we think is superbly executed. After that we found ourselves becoming more and more involved with the whole subject matter. We are, of course, delighted that you too like it and consider it money well spent.

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  64. Oh this is a very impressive and rather unexpected work to have fallen for - I so enjoyed peering at the detail that you had described so very well. It is definitely compelling - and I'm delighted you have such a responsive little piggy. (Mine is a grumpy old thing - won't part with a bean!)Thank you so much for sharing it with us.
    It has etched itself in my mind's eye - what an extraordinary talent - well-spotted, you two!
    Axxx

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    1. Certainly, Annie, this is very different from most of the other pictures which we have but, as you have said, we found it most 'compelling' and were, at first sighting, immediately drawn to it. Now it is a question of if and when we can stretch that piggy bank for a further purchase!!

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  65. What a lovely post. It's gratifying to hear how the artist moved you.

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    1. We are so very pleased that you enjoyed the post, Sally. Thank you so much for taking the time to comment.

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  66. You didn't!

    (I would have too, I think because that is so imaginative)
    I love the window art :) Think you can do that on your windows? To match what the child did?

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    1. How splendid that you too, Phyllis, would have fallen for Ádám Hollós' painting. We find it endlessly fascinating and intriguing and, of course, are inspired to draw on our own windows!!

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  67. Dear Jane and Lance,

    I do like the painting and enjoyed reading your observations of it. Congratulations on starting your new collection. I am sure it wiil give you much pleasure in the years to come.

    Who needs Faberge eggs or Georgian silver anyway? You always have to worry about it being stolen and who needs that aggravation.

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    1. We continue to derive more and more pleasure from the painting, Arleen, and are sure that this will always be the case.

      As you say, who needs things like Fabergé eggs which, in any case, we rather dislike - all of that very fancy ornamentation!!

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  68. Dear Jane and Lance- I am the same as you, and have no collections ( books don't count!) except there have been some paintings I just have to have! I too have shared that feeling trepidation and excitment when emptying the bank account and then hanging the painting back at home. I still look at and am moved by my ' collection' every day that passes.Jane xx

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    1. You are right, Jane, books do not count although on that subject we did collect, and still have, First Edition gardening books from the late C19 through to the last years of the C20.

      There are, as you suggest, occasionally some things for which it seems worth emptying the bank account which always, in time, recovers!

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  69. Hi Jane and Lance and congratulations on the purchase of your artwork. I was really quite taken with 'Hermeneutika' by Ádám Hollós. The colours and painting techniques used are fantastic and I am sure you had a wonderful time exploring the artistic talents of so many creative geniuses. It reminded me of the Battersea Art Show in London. Enjoy your new painting, you have purchased a special piece there x

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    1. We are delighted to learn that you too are very much smitten with Ádám Hollós' 'Hermeneutika' which, we know, will give us endless interest and pleasure.

      Yes, the Budapest Art Market is not, we think, so very dissimilar to the Battersea Art Show although we have for whatever reason never attended it.

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  70. Your choice would have spoken to me too. It takes you back to ones childhood where escape is simply as easy as opening your vast imagination.

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    1. Yes, in so many ways the painting does recall childhood and escaping into a world so very different from that of the adult one.

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  71. Hey now, don't knock the Faberge! I love their eggs :D

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  72. I like this painting very very much. While I see a very hard look about the boy and grimness about the mouth, there seems to me a certain gentle sensuousness about the hands drawing on the window and it makes me want to see him smile ...

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    1. We are so interested to read your response to the painting, Katherine, and are equally pleased that you like this example of Ádám Hollós' work.

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  73. Great choice! Very impressive painting!

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    1. Thank you so much and for taking the time and trouble to comment.

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  74. Nice painting!
    http://budapestart.ahomina.com/budapest-art/exhibition/hollos-adam-at-varfolk-project-room/2936/
    bullet shih

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    1. Bullet, how really kind of you to comment. And we are so pleased that you like the painting too. There were, we thought, some most interesting pieces at the Art Market. We look forward to meeting up again on your return to the Motherland!!

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  75. Enjoy your lovely painting. How nice your piggy obliged :-)

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    1. Thank you so much. We are certain that it will continue to give us a great deal of pleasure.

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  76. It sure is a powerful work of art, I am glad you are the custodian of it now. Your description of the painting is very thought provoking, why should I not agree with it.

    Best wishes and deepest thanks for your kind words.

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    1. We have been thrilled with the varying responses that the painting has elicited. It is such fun and incredibly fascinating to read so many different interpretations and perspectives. That is what makes Art come alive!

      We were so sad to read of all your recent troubles and trust that you are now finding a way forward. We always feel that problems 'come not as single spies but in battalions' and often seeing a clear way ahead can be difficult. However, one is always given the strength to cope. Our thoughts and prayers are with you!

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  77. Thank you so much for this most intriguing post. I got to meet a new artist, see this painting through your eyes, and now know it found the perfect home!

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    1. We have met so many artists on your blog that it is a pleasure to be able to make a new introduction for you.There is a thriving Art scene in Budapest but only a few artists are known internationally. It is a joy to be able to play a small part in bringing these very talented young people to a wider audience.

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  78. Art is life! What a wonderful post of your experience!

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    1. Yes, what a wonderful sentiment, Gina! Without Art, Life is certainly less rich.

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  79. This painting is superb! I can attest to the feel of it-- having lived in NYC for almost a decade--his rendering of the graffiti transported me right back to that time and place. NY was much rougher back then, and this painting so captures that feel of the underbelly of an intensely urban environment. Hooray for you for adding it to your collection (and I am so humbled to think that my little drawing is a part of it :)).
    xo

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    1. How well you understand us, Elizabeth, for it is precisely that urban grittiness that has such an appeal. In addition, at even first glance, this painting represented Eastern Europe for us with all its troubled past and its insecurities for the future. We find more in it every day.

      Your drawing is an essential and much treasured part of our collection, dearest Elizabeth, and it looks wonderfully well now that it is framed. One day we should dearly hope that you will see it in situ. That would be a great joy!

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  80. Steamy windows evoke the cold outside, and the nubby-rough of his trousers is fabric of Winter---perhaps he's going to the country to his Apa for the Holidays, and he's not quite looking forward to the journey.

    And when the train stops for coal or water in an outlying town, I'll be the girl up a tree, reaching far-far toward the glass from the other side.

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    1. There certainly does seem to be apprehension in the body language of the boy as if, as you say, he is not looking forward to what or where the journey may take him.

      And oh, those marvellous days of steam trains, how wonderfully you bring them to mind here. We can well imagine you, dearest Rachel, the slip of a 'GRITS' shinning up a tree to catch a bird's eye view!!!

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  81. How many times have we sat at a car window or kitchen window and drawn on it.. This young fellow typical of a boy coming home from school, doodling and passing the time away while he reaches his stop.
    A very different painting , a lot of depth .. I would imagine that the artist might have been remembering when he was a child!
    A very nice purchase.. thanks to piggy.
    happy evening Lance and Jane.

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    1. We are so pleased, Val, that you with your painterly eye have enjoyed looking at this painting. We too find that there are depths to be discovered in this work which reveal themselves little by little. Therein lies its intrigue for us!

      Hoping that you are well!

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  82. The thing about collecting is it gives focus to whatever you love. You can still buy and display other objects that are outside your main collecting focus, but at least there is no need to run around like a hairy goat, trying to cover everything.

    Also friends will try and help out. If an auction is coming up that you hadn't heard about, good friends will be alert. If you have a big wedding anniversary soon and don't want 6 more fondue sets, friends will get together and add to your collection.

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    1. Now, Hels, can one ever have too many fondue sets??!

      We do rather like your interpretation of a collection as providing a focus for things for which one has a real feeling, over and above whatever else one may choose to surround oneself with. This certainly puts it all into some kind of perspective.

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  83. I have always deeply appreciated when the senses overlap in a work of art: a tactile quality to something visual, a flavor to a song.

    I also truly love the phrase, 'glittering firmament.' There is something frosty and magic about it.

    Love.

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    1. We also truly love, dearest Suze, 'a flavour to a song'. What a wonderful expression that is.

      And yes, Ádám Hollós' work does permit an overlap of the senses.

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  84. It's quite wonderful. Technically adept and intriguing, and visually and emotionally powerful. I'd have raided a few piggy banks for such a gem!

    Alas our funds do not extend to paintings but we have some lovely limited edition fine art prints ... apart from whippets and knitting yarn it's the only thing close to a collection in this house.

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    1. This is so very kind and generous of you, Annie. We are so pleased that you like the painting.

      We too have a number of limited edition prints and etchings, some of which we treasure very highly. Alas no whippets, but we do recognize the grace and beauty of these very desirable dogs. Now, knitting yarn....!

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  85. Oh Jane and Lance, this is such a beautiful and somewhat melancholy painting. It broke my heart for a moment there.
    I am sure you will have many, many hours of enjoyment from this purchase. It seems to hide so many sotires and your interpretation of it so beautiful and touching.
    Thank you for sharing it here with us.

    Red

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    1. There is indeed something rather melancholy about the painting, Red, which for us encapsulates the rather sad state of some of Eastern Europe and, alas, of Hungary in particular. But, of course, its very sadness adds to its interest.

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  86. Dear Jane and Lance ~ Congratulations on the new acquisition, you collectors! It is definitely a powerful and graphic piece. Perhaps you can tell us more about Ádám Hollós?
    Cheers,
    Loi

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    1. Thank you, Loi. Ádám Hollós is a young artist, having graduated in, we think, 2011, whose first major exhibition was held by the Várfok Gallery here in Budapest in April of this year. We hope to meet him at the gallery before too long and to see more of his work.

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  87. When art speaks to you it is necessary to empty the piggy. I have never regretted a thoughtful purchase of art. The emotions in your art piece are strong and certainly a reflection of Hungary and its history.

    The words you use to describe the brush strokes and themes speak to the connection you felt. It has found a good home, dear friends.

    Bises,
    Genie

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    1. What you say here is both encouraging and supportive, Genie. Sometimes, as you suggest, it really is a matter of Carpe Diem for these opportunities seldom come around a second time.

      Now we have to decide on where it will hang and in which room.

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  88. What an interesting and somewhat unexpected discovery you made.

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    1. We had thought that the Art Market would be interesting and, in the end,it surpassed all our expectations. We were tempted by several pieces but finances dictated that only one would come home with us!

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  89. Hello Jane and Lance, congratulations on your new acquisition. It is definitely an arresting painting. I noticed it straight away before I started reading your wonderful descriptive piece on it. I do hope you have managed to find just the right spot for it at home? I am sure the artist would be thrilled to know it has gone to such a good home. Much love, Linda x

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    1. We have already had some discussion with the artist as it so happens that we purchased the picture on his birthday. He felt it to be a super present!!

      On our return from Venice we shall meet up with him at the gallery to see other examples of his work and to discuss them with him in person. We are looking forward to that very much.

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  90. I don't blame you for kidnapping it.... the painting is arresting and emotive and, seems to me, quite unique! Happy day to find a 'find'! =]

    xxo

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    1. Yes, dearest Katy, we find the painting charged with emotion and are now sure that this is what has attracted us to it. So many messages, all open to interpretation, which we find endlessly fascinating. We are so pleased that you like it too.

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  91. My dear Jane and Lance, A beautiful painting and a beautiful interpretation. This beautiful picture reminds me of a Scottish artist, William Dyce's one of this famous paintings called Titian Preparing to make his First Essay in Colouring. I think Chinese philosopher, Confucius once said "I eat to live. I look at flowers for the reason for living". Art is like that - it is a merging of the inside and outside - our hearts and heads - distance and closeness and our lives are far richer for it. I'm saying this not because I'm an art historian but as a person who came from a place where art and literature just don't exist in the menu. I would say forget about acquiring Fabergé eggs because what you just got is definitely not an egg. It's a pearl.

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    1. Dearest ASD, we cannot say how delighted we are that you, of all people, are pleased with our choice. We did not think too hard about it as it just seemed right that we should make it ours. Out of the hundreds of paintings at the Art Market, this one just spoke to us and we quickly made the decision to make it ours. We have not regretted it for a single moment since.

      We do not know of the work of William Dyce but we shall most certainly look him up. The title of the painting is simply glorious! Your quotation from Confucius is totally wonderful and captures our feelings on this whole topic of Art as food for the soul, something which we earnestly believe in.

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  92. I am commenting late because I couldn't stop looking at the picture. Every time I came back to the blog my eyes got stuck. Well done.

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    1. We too find the painting totally absorbing and are, all of the time, discovering some new and fresh aspect of it.

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  93. Well done, what are piggy banks for, if not to be emptied and applied to more useful purpose than gathering dust in a miser’s hole.

    Congratulations on your new prize.

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    1. We are completely at one with you over your approach to a piggy bank. Hoarding is never a good thing.

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  94. Lance and Jane,

    I know that you are off air but I wanted to come and say hello! I hope that your trip is not too very wet, the water seems to be almost at record high. Do be safe, enjoy your time there as well as with your friend.

    Looking forward to many exciting, amusing and enjoyable adventures.

    Elizabeth

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  95. dang. third time trying...hope springs eternal.
    In the eye of the beholder, Jane and Lance, it is what you say it is.
    BTW, I thought y'all were in Brighton...no? Venus? Very nice!
    God speed on your travels.

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